First occurence of Aedes japonicus in Luxembourg

3 female imago of Aedes japonicus (Theobald, 1901) have been captured on 4th July 2018 in Stolzembourg in the valley of the Our (Oesling). Field prospection on 1st and 2nd August showed the East Asian bush mosquito is also present in Bivels, Vianden, Wahlhausen and Gemünd (D). Further investigations will be undertaken in August to assess the geographical distribution of the species in Luxembourg.

Aedes japonicus is a mosquito species originally native to Japan, Korea and southern China, and is important for humans as a potential vector of pathogens such as the West Nile virus and of various types of encephalitis viruses.

The species is already established in the Province of Namur (Belgium), in North Rhine-Westphalia, Rhineland-Palatinate (Kreis Ahrweiler) and Hesse (Germany), and in Bas-Rhin, Haut-Rhin, Vosges (France).

Advice for the population

Web pages

Flyers

Useful links

 Last updated on Thursday, August 9, 2018.

Aedes japonicus (Theobald, 1901)

English East Asian bush or rock pool mosquito ISEIA: C2
Lëtzebuergesch Japanesch Hecke-Moustique EASIN
Français n/a Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English - East Asian bush mosquito Wikipedia - Français Wikipedia - Deutsch - Asiatische Buschmücke Wikipedia - Nederlands
Deutsch Asiatische Buschmücke Wikispecies: n/a
Nederlands Aziatische bosmug Back to the list of invertebrates

Advice for the population

Web pages

Flyers

Importance and distribution in Luxembourg

Distribution map of Aedes japonicus (Theobald, 1901) in Luxembourg. Recorder database, MNHNL, 20.08.2018.

3 female imago of Aedes japonicus (Syn.: Hulecoeteomyia japonica) have been captured on 4th July 2018 in Stolzembourg, Oesling. Field prospection on 1st and 2nd August showed the East Asian bush mosquito is also present in Bivels, Vianden, Wahlhausen and Gemünd (D). Further investigations will be undertaken in August to assess the geographical distribution of the species in Luxembourg.

The species is already established in the Province of Namur (Belgium), in North Rhine-Westphalia, Rhineland-Palatinate and Hesse (Germany), and in Bas-Rhin, Haut-Rhin, Vosges (France).

Aedes japonicus is a mosquito species originally native to Japan, Korea and southern China, and is important for humans as a potential vector of pathogens such as the West Nile virus and of various types of encephalitis viruses.

Risk assessment

ISEIA protocol: C2 (3+2+2+1), assessment updated on 13 August 2018 by M. Pfeiffenschneider & C. Ries. Former assessment under it’s synonym Hulecoeteomyia japonica: C0 (2+1+1+1) (Ries et al. 2017: 68).

Initial importations and spread in Europe

Source: https://ecdc.europa.eu/en/disease-vectors/facts/mosquito-factsheets/aedes-japonicus [accessed July 31 2018]

Aedes japonicus was first reported in Europe in 2000 when it was detected in Normandy (Orne) in northern France, where it was later eliminated. It was then reported in 2002 in Belgium at a tyre depot and presence as adults and larvae was confirmed in 2007 and 2008. It was most likely introduced through the trade of tyres and the population was thought to be established at the company site but does not appear to be spreading. It was detected in Switzerland in 2008 following reports of a biting nuisance and subsequent surveys revealed a 1,400 km colonised zone including an area in Germany. This was the first detection of invasive mosquitospreading in central Europe. No obvious route of introduction was identified in this study but it is suspected that the species has been present here for some time. Adult Ae. japonicus were then found in Southern Germany during 2011, following intensified surveillance. This resulted in surveillance expanding to cover the entire federal state of Baden-Württemberg where a reduction in the colonised areas compared to 2010 was reported (possibly due to a dry spring during 2011). However, a large, newly infested area was also reported from the city of Stuttgart to the Swabian Mountains. Entomological surveys carried out during 2012 in North Rhine-Westphalia also revealed the presence of an established population in the west of the country. Aedes japonicus were then reported further north in southern Lower Saxony and northeastern North Rhine-Westphalia during spring 2013. It was detected in 2012 and 2013 in Lelystad, the Netherlands.

Source: European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control: The map shows the current known distribution of Aedes japonicus in Europe at at ‘regional’ administrative level (NUTS3), as of June 2018.

Possible future expansion 

It is suggested that Aedes japonicus may expand beyond its current geographical distribution but there is still a lack of information available on this invasive mosquito species.

References

  • Ministère de la Santé, 2018. Première apparition du moustique japonais « Aedes japonicus » au Luxembourg. Communiqué de presse du 1er août 2018. [PDF 40 KB]
  • Ries, C., A. Arendt, C. Braunert, S. Christian, A. Dohet, A. Frantz, G. Geimer, M. Hellers, J. A. Massard, X. Mestdagh, R. Proess, N. Schneider & M. Pfeiffenschneider, 2017. Environmental impact assessment and black, watch and alert list classification after the ISEIA Protocol of invertebrates in Luxembourg. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 119: 63-70. [PDF 360 KB]

 Last updated on Tuesday, August 14, 2018.

Orconectes immunis (Hagen, 1870)

English Papershell crayfish
ISEIA: A0 – Alert List
Lëtzebuergesch n/a EASIN
Français Ecrevisse calicot Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English - Orconectes immunis  Wikipedia - Français - Ecrevisse calicot Wikipedia - Deutsch - Kalikokrebs Nederlands - Calicotrivierkreeft
Deutsch Kalikokrebs Wikispecies: n/a (2017)
Nederlands Calicotrivierkreeft Back to the list of invertebrates

Importance and distribution in Luxembourg

The species has not yet been documented in Luxembourg.

Risk assessment

ISEIA protocol: A0 (3+3+3+2) = Alert List (Ries et al. 2017: 68).

Bibliography concerning Luxembourg

  • Ries, C., A. Arendt, C. Braunert, S. Christian, A. Dohet, A. Frantz, G. Geimer, M. Hellers, J. A. Massard, X. Mestdagh, R. Proess, N. Schneider & M. Pfeiffenschneider, 2017. Environmental impact assessment and black, watch and alert list classification after the ISEIA Protocol of invertebrates in Luxembourg. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 119: 63-70. [PDF 360 KB]

 Last updated on Tuesday, April 10, 2018.

Dicranopalpus ramosus (Simon, 1909)

English n/a ISEIA: C2
Lëtzebuergesch Streckfouss EASIN
Français n/a Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English - Dicranopalpus ramosus  Wikipedia - Français - Dicranopalpus ramosus Wikipedia - Deutsch - Nederlands - Strekpoot
Deutsch Streckfuß Wikispecies: n/a (2017)
Nederlands Strekpoot Back to the list of invertebrates

Importance and distribution in Luxembourg

Distribution map of Dicranopalpus ramosus (Simon, 1909) in Luxembourg. Recorder database, MNHNL, 20.08.2018.

Five occurrences of the species in Luxembourg are documented in the Recorder database, the first dating from 2007. In the Gutland meanwhile widespread, in the Ösling probably still largely missing (Muster & Meyer 2014: 38-39).

Originally the species was found in Morocco. Later it spread into Europe, with first reports in Portugal (1948), where it spread to Spain (1965) and France (1969). The Netherlands were reached in 1992. Since 2004 it is known to occur in Germany. As early as 1957, it was reported in Bournemouth, southern England, from where it spread all over the island, reaching Scotland in 2000. In 2010, one occurrence in Denmark was documented. 1

Risk assessment

ISEIA protocol: C2 (2+2+2+1) (Ries et al. 2017: 68).

Bibliography concerning Luxembourg

  • Muster, C. & M. Meyer, 2014. Verbreitungsatlas der Weberknechte des Großherzogtums Luxemburg. Ferrantia 70, Musée national d’histoire naturelle, Luxembourg, 112 p.
  • Ries, C., A. Arendt, C. Braunert, S. Christian, A. Dohet, A. Frantz, G. Geimer, M. Hellers, J. A. Massard, X. Mestdagh, R. Proess, N. Schneider & M. Pfeiffenschneider, 2017. Environmental impact assessment and black, watch and alert list classification after the ISEIA Protocol of invertebrates in Luxembourg. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 119: 63-70. [PDF 360 KB]

 Last updated on Friday, July 13, 2018.

Brigittea civica (Lucas, 1850)

English n/a ISEIA: C3
Lëtzebuergesch n/a EASIN
Français n/a Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English - Brigittea civica Nederlands - Zuiders kaardertje
Deutsch  n/a Wikispecies: n/a (2017)
Nederlands Zuiders kaardertje Back to the list of invertebrates

Importance and distribution in Luxembourg

Distribution map of Brigittea civica (Lucas, 1850) in Luxembourg. Recorder database, MNHNL, 20.08.2018.

29 occurrences of the species have been documented in Luxembourg in the Recorder database under it’s synonym Dictyna civica (Status: July 2018). The species is estimated to be very common.

Risk assessment

ISEIA protocol: C3 (2+1+2+1) (Ries et al. 2017: 68).

Bibliography concerning Luxembourg

  • Ries, C., A. Arendt, C. Braunert, S. Christian, A. Dohet, A. Frantz, G. Geimer, M. Hellers, J. A. Massard, X. Mestdagh, R. Proess, N. Schneider & M. Pfeiffenschneider, 2017. Environmental impact assessment and black, watch and alert list classification after the ISEIA Protocol of invertebrates in Luxembourg. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 119: 63-70. [PDF 360 KB]

 Last updated on Tuesday, July 10, 2018.

DNADIVE – New research project on invasive crayfish

See also the project web page at https://faune-flore.lu/dnadive/

DNADIVE aims at developing a molecular toolbox enabling eDNA detection for Invasive crayfish in streams of Luxembourg. This Public2 Partnership project has been accepted by FNR in November 2017 and will start on 1st January 2018. The project will be hosted by Fondation faune-flore and it’s principal investigator will be the French researcher Dr David Porco. Project partnership: Luxembourg National Museum of Natural History (MNHNL), Luxembourg Institute of Science & Technology (LIST), Water management Agency (AGE), Ministry for Sustainable Development and Infrastructure (MDDI), University of Duisburg-Essen (Germany).

Abstract

DNADIVE aims at developing a toolbox for the molecular monitoring of invasive crayfish in the streams of Luxembourg. Three exotic species (Orconectes limosus, Pacifastacus leniusculus and Astacus leptodactylus) and a native one (Astacus astacus) will be targeted for the project.

This molecular toolbox will encompass several techniques of detection comprising (1) a simple amplification method easily performed in a laboratory with few elements, (2) a digital droplet amplification (ddPCR) which is a more elaborated lab method that can allow for a higher detection sensitivity and a possible quantification of DNA that could be related through the proxy of biomass and abundance to the size of the populations detected and (3) an isotherm amplification method (iPCR) i.e. a simple, cost effective approach which will allow for a field detection usable by non-trained agents.

The results will enable the development of a predictive species distribution model for the target species and to infer their impact on freshwater communities through the comparison with previous sampling campaigns. This set of methods has the high potential to efficiently contribute to early detection and routine monitoring of the invasive crayfish species in Luxembourg, thus allowing for a timely and efficient decision-making and appropriate management.

 Last updated on Monday, December 11, 2017.

Luxembourg reports Nutria to the EU within the EASIN notification system

On 19th September 2017, a forester captured a Nutria (Myocastor coypus) in Osweiler (commune of Rosport, eastern Luxembourg) and put it to sleep.

This detection of an IAS of Union concern (Anonymous 2016) has been notified by the Luxembourg authorities on 26 September 2017 and an Eradication Measure Set has been submitted as well on 26 September 2017, pursuant to Article 17(1) of R. 1143/2014 (Anonymous 2014).

Biberratte - Nutria - coypu - Myocastor coypus - ragondin - castor des marais - Mönchbruch - December 25th 2012 - 03

Coypu (Myocastor coypus), Moenchbruch lake, Hesse, Germany.
By Norbert Nagel (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

The species was first documented in Luxembourg in 1957 at the Alzette river next to Hunsdorf (Municipality of Lorentzweiler). Currently, it is only observed sporadically in Luxembourg. Because of its occurrence in the bordering regions of France (Chiers, Moselle) and Germany (Saar), it is likely that the species will populate national watercourses within the near future (Becker-Krüll & Schaefer 2013).

Bibliography

  • Anonymous, 2014. Regulation (EU) No 1143/2014 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 22 October 2014 on the prevention and management of the introduction and spread of invasive alien species. Official Journal of the European Union 4.11.2014 L 317: 35-55.
  • Anonymous, 2016. Commission implementing regulation (EU) 2016/1141 of 13 July 2016 adopting a list of invasive alien species of Union concern pursuant to Regulation (EU) No 1143/2014 of the European Parliament and of the Council. Official Journal of the European Union L 189: 4-5.
  • Becker-Krüll, L. & P. Schaefer, 2013. Jagdbare Wildtierarten Luxemburgs. Administration de la nature et des forêts, Luxembourg, 96 pp.

 Last updated on Thursday, September 28, 2017.

2016 Mosquito survey catches determined

In 2016, the Luxembourg National Natural History Museum has started a survey on mosquito species in Luxembourg. Between July and October mosquitoes have been weekly trapped on 10 sites throughout the country, in co-operation with local and regional partner organizations and private persons.

On June 14th and 15th 2017, Mosquito specialist Dr Francis Schaffner from University of Zurich determined the 2016 catches at the Museum.

F.l.t.r.: Svenja Christian (Department of Invertebrates Zoology MNHNL) and Dr Francis Schaffner (University of Zurich) in the Lab of the Department of Ecology. Photo: Dr Christian Ries, MNHNL, 15 June 2016.

Results

182 mosquitoes were caught during 90 catches from 10 sites.

Culex pipiens / torrentium (9 out of 10 sites)
175
Anopheles plumbeus (Kockelscheuer, Steinsel)
3
Culiseta annulata (Remerschen)
1
Coquillettidia richiardii (Remerschen)
1
Aedes vexans (Kockelscheuer)
1
Aedes cinereus (Kockelscheuer) 1

Locality, Partners (#Catches|#Specimen)

We thank the following partners who have run the traps on their sites.

  • Diekirch, Administration de la nature et des forêts (11|0)
  • Esch-sur-Sûre, Naturpark Öewersauer (PNHS) (12|9)
  • Kalborn-Moulin, natur&ëmwelt – Fondation Hëllef fir d’Natur (10|6)
  • Kockelscheier, natur&ëmwelt – Haus vun der Natur (11|48)
  • Leudelange, private owner (10|27)
  • Lintgen, private owner (9|23)
  • Luxembourg / Grund, MNHNL (11|19)
  • Remerschen, Biodiversum (5|16)
  • Schrassig, private owner (6|24)
  • Steinsel, private owner (5|10)

 Last updated on Thursday, June 15, 2017.

Pectinatella magnifica (Leidy, 1851)

English n/a ISEIA: C1
Lëtzebuergesch Schwamp-Moosdéierchen EASIN
Français Pectinatelle Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English - Greater duckweed Wikipedia - Français - Lentille d'eau géante Wikipedia - Deutsch - Vielwurzelige Teichlinse Nederlands
Deutsch Schwammartiges Moostierchen Wikispecies: Wikispecies - Pectinatella magnifica
Nederlands n/a Back to the list of invertebrates

Importance and distribution in Luxembourg

In 2012 numerous colonies of Pectinatella magnifica (Leidy, 1851) (Bryozoa, Phylactolaemata) were discovered in the reservoir of Esch-sur-Sûre (Luxembourg) fed by the river Sûre. The colonies were particularly abundant in the shallow, warm and nutrient rich water near the riverbank, but some colonies were spotted by divers in the reservoir at a depth of 8-9 m in one site and more than 20 m in another site. There is reliable evidence, that Pectinatella was present, but less conspicuous and not identified as such, in 2011 and possibly already in 2010. P. magnifica was hitherto unrecorded from Luxembourg, but known from a site near the German-Luxembourg border near Nennig (Germany, Saarland) where statoblasts were found in 2001 (Massard et al. 2013).

Risk assessment

ISEIA protocol: C1 (3+2+1+1) (Ries et al. 2017: 68).

Bibliography concerning Luxembourg

  • Massard, J.A., G. Geimer & E. Wille, 2013. Apparition de Pectinella magnifica (Leidy, 1851) (Bryozoa, Phylactolaemata) dans le lac de barrage d’Esch-sur-Sûre (Luxembourg). Bulletin de la Société des naturalistes luxembourgeois 114: 131-148.
  • Massard, J.A. & G. Geimer, 2015. L’histoire de la recherche bryozoologique au Luxembourg (Phylactolémates et Gymnolémates d’eau douce). Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 116: 373-379. [PDF 1,35 MB]
  • Ries, C., A. Arendt, C. Braunert, S. Christian, A. Dohet, A. Frantz, G. Geimer, M. Hellers, J. A. Massard, X. Mestdagh, R. Proess, N. Schneider & M. Pfeiffenschneider, 2017. Environmental impact assessment and black, watch and alert list classification after the ISEIA Protocol of invertebrates in Luxembourg. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 119: 63-70. [PDF 360 KB]

 Last updated on Tuesday, April 10, 2018.