Trachemys scripta (Thunberg in Schoepff, 1792)

English Pond slider Status LU: established. 1st record: ?
Lëtzebuergesch Nordamerikanesch Buschtaf-Schmockschillkröt, -deckelsmouk Status EU: established. IAS of EU concern (2016).
Français n/a RA: see subspecies elegans & scripta
Deutsch Nordamerikanische Buchstaben-Schmuckschildkröte Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English - Yellow-bellied slider Wikipedia - Français - Trachemys scripta scripta Wikipedia - Deutsch - Gelbbauch-Schmuckschildkröte | Wikispecies: Wikispecies - Trachemys scripta scripta
Nederlands n/a Back to the list of vertebrates

Brief description

Trachemys scripta (Thunberg in Schoepff, 1792) is a species of common, medium-sized, semi-aquatic turtle. It has been listed as one of the “Top 100” World’s Worst Invaders. These turtles often fight with native species for food, habitat, and other resources. Eventually they bully many native species out of basking sites – areas where there is sunlight and warmth for the species. When basking it is common that pond sliders will do so on birds’ nests, thereby killing the eggs. They also prey on young birds. Turtles that were raised in captivity can develop diseases that are unfamiliar to native species, which can be harmful. Turtles raised in captivity are often released because they become too much to handle or grow bigger than expected. It’s not uncommon that pond sliders will also run away (Wikipedia contributors 2020).

IAS of Union concern

In 2016, Trachemys scripta (Thunberg in Schoepff, 1792) was added to the list of invasive alien species of Union concern (Anonymous 2016) which implies that member states shall take all necessary steps to prevent its unintentional introduction or spread.

Status and distribution in Luxembourg

Records of Trachemys scripta scripta Thunberg in Schoepff, 1792 in Luxembourg. Data source: Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2020-05-25.

Currently, 155 records in Luxembourg are accessible through the MNHNL-mdata portal, when combining the species (133) with its two subspecies, scripta (7) and elegans (15) present in Luxembourg (MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF 2020).

Risk assessment

See the subspecies pages for further details.

Worldwide distribution

Other Trachemys taxa

The pond slider Trachemys scripta (Thunberg in Schoepff, 1792) has three subspecies (Wikipedia contributors 2020b), of which the first two occur in Luxembourg:

Bibliography

  • Anonymous, 2016. Commission implementing regulation (EU) 2016/1141 of 13 July 2016 adopting a list of invasive alien species of Union concern pursuant to Regulation (EU) No 1143/2014 of the European Parliament and of the Council. Official Journal of the European Union L 189: 4-5.
  • GBIF, 2019. Trachemys scripta (Thunberg In Schoepff, 1792) in GBIF Secretariat (2019). GBIF Backbone Taxonomy. Checklist dataset https://doi.org/10.15468/39omei [accessed 2020-04-27]
  • MNHNL, 2000-. Trachemys scripta scripta (Thunberg in Schoepff, 1792) in Recorder-Lux, database on the natural heritage of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. Musée national d’histoire naturelle, Luxembourg. URL: https://mdata.mnhn.lu [Accessed 2020-02-04]
  • MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2019. Trachemys scripta scripta (Thunberg in Schoepff, 1792) in MNHNL-mdata, online portal combining species observation from Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist and GBIF. National Museum of Natural History, Luxembourg. URL: https://mdata.mnhn.lu [Accessed 2020-02-04]
  • Wikipedia contributors, 2020. ‘Pond slider’, Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 8 January 2020, 04:07 UTC, <https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Pond_slider&oldid=934733603> [accessed 2020-04-27]

 Page content last updated on 2020-04-30. Last proofread by Caroline Grounds on 2020-04-30.

Wandering cribellate spider Zoropsis spinimana discovered in Echternach

On November 15th 2018 Jos A. Massard and Gaby Geimer discovered a female of the wandering cribellate spider Zoropsis spinimana on the window of a pastry shop in Echternach (Massard & Geimer 2018). This spider is a new species for Luxembourg and is currently spreading throughout Europe. The detailed up-to-date distribution of the species can be found on the Luxembourgian Wikipedia (Wikipedia-Bearbeiter 2018).

The home of Zoropsis spinimana is the western Mediterranean region up to the southern edge of the Alps and Dalmatia, as well as North Africa, where it occurs in the open in light forests, under stones and bark, or in and around buildings (Wikipedia contributors 2018).

References

 Page content last updated on 2019-11-11. Last proofread by Caroline Grounds on 2019-11-11.

First evidence of Aedes japonicus in Luxembourg

3 female imagoes of Aedes japonicus (Theobald, 1901) were captured on 4th July 2018 in Stolzembourg in the valley of the Our (Oesling). Field exploration on 1st and 2nd August showed the East Asian bush mosquito is also present in Bivels, Vianden, Wahlhausen and Gemünd (D). Further investigations will be undertaken in August to assess the geographical distribution of the species in Luxembourg.

Aedes japonicus is a mosquito species originally native to Japan, Korea and southern China, and is important for humans as a potential vector of pathogens such as the West Nile virus and of various types of encephalitis viruses.

The species is already established in the Province of Namur (Belgium), in North Rhine-Westphalia, Rhineland-Palatinate (Kreis Ahrweiler) and Hesse (Germany), and in Bas-Rhin, Haut-Rhin, Vosges (France).

Advice for the population

Web pages

Flyers

Useful links

 Page content last updated on 2019-11-11. Last proofread by Caroline Grounds on 2019-11-11.

Aedes japonicus (Theobald, 1901)

English East Asian bush or rock pool mosquito Status LU: established. 1st record: 2018.
Lëtzebuergesch Japanesch Hecke-Moustique Status EU: established.
Français n/a RA: ISEIA: C2. Harmonia+: 0,34.
Deutsch Asiatische Buschmücke Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English - East Asian bush mosquito Wikipedia - Français Wikipedia - Deutsch - Asiatische Buschmücke Wikipedia - Nederlands | Wikispecies: n/a (2020)
Nederlands Aziatische bosmug Back to the list of invertebrates

Brief description

CDC 7886 Ochlerotatus japonicusAedes japonicus (Theobald, 1901), commonly known as the Asian bush mosquito or the Asian rock pool mosquito, has four known subspecies Ae. j. japonicus, Ae. j. shintienensis, Ae. j. yaeyamensis, and Ae. j. amamiensus. They are competent arbovirus vectors known to transmit the West Nile virus as well as Japanese and St. Louis encephalitis. They are listed as an invasive species by the Global Invasive Species Database.

Adults live in forested areas and are day biters, but are apparently reluctant to bite humans. In the laboratory, they feed on chicks and mice but not on reptiles or amphibians. Larvae occur in a wide variety of natural and artificial water retainers such as tree holes and rock holes, usually preferring shaded places and water rich in organic matter. They are found from early spring to early autumn in their native habitat of Central Japan. They overwinter as eggs in cooler regions and larvae in warmer regions. Adults have a distinctive bronze-colored, lyre-shaped pattern on the scutum, and larvae have a linear arrangement of branched frontal setae and a strongly spiculated anal saddle (Wikipedia contributors 2020).

Advice for the population

Please refer to the Internet page https://mosquitoes.lu/dealing-with-mosquitoes/ for detailed information in 5 languages (Lëtzebuergesch Français Deutsch Portugues English) on how to deal with mosquitoes near your home.

Status and distribution in Luxembourg

Records of Aedes japonicus (Theobald, 1901) in Luxembourg. Data source: Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2020-05-25.

3 female imagoes of Aedes japonicus (Syn.: Hulecoeteomyia japonica) were captured on 4th July 2018 in Stolzembourg, Oesling. Field exploration on 1st and 2nd August showed the East Asian bush mosquito is also present in Bivels, Vianden, Wahlhausen and Gemünd (D). Further field studies in August and October 2018 revealed the presence of a large population of Aedes japonicus, detected in 16 sites distributed over 12 localities, 12 municipalities, 7 cantons and 3 districts. The colonised area can be estimated to date to cover at least 550 km², located in the east of the Grand Duchy, from the valley of the Our in the north to Ernster in the south, and as far as Kautenbach and Ettelbruck in the west. The mosquito was not detected in neighbouring Belgium (Clairefontaine and Ouren) but it was in Germany, where it has been present for several years in Rhineland-Palatinate and from where it has certainly migrated to the Grand Duchy. We also detected it in the French border town of Contz-les-Bains, which suggests that the mosquito is probably present, although not detected to date, in the region bordering the Moselle, from Manternach to the French border (Schaffner 2018).

Distribution of the mosquito Aedes japonicus known as of 10 October 2018, for Luxembourg and the neighbouring regions of Germany, Belgium and France. Purple: proven presence; Purple with star: data from the German surveillance network; Green: undetected presence (Schaffner 2018).

The species is established in the Province of Namur (Belgium), in North Rhine-Westphalia, Rhineland-Palatinate and Hesse (Germany), and in Bas-Rhin, Haut-Rhin, Vosges (France).

Risk assessment

ISEIA protocol

C2 (3+2+2+1), assessment updated on 13 August 2018 by M. Pfeiffenschneider & C. Ries. Former assessment under it’s synonym Hulecoeteomyia japonica: C0 (2+1+1+1) (Ries et al. 2017: 68).

Harmonia+ protocol

Overall risk score 0,34 = (Overall Invasion score 0,67 x Overall Impact score 0,50) (Schaffner & Ries 2019: 178).

0,67Invasion
0,50Impact
0,34Risk

Initial importations and spread in Europe

Source: https://ecdc.europa.eu/en/disease-vectors/facts/mosquito-factsheets/aedes-japonicus [accessed July 31 2018]

Aedes japonicus was first reported in Europe in 2000 when it was detected in Normandy (Orne) in northern France, where it was later eliminated. It was then reported in 2002 in Belgium at a tyre depot and presence as adults and larvae was confirmed in 2007 and 2008. It was most likely introduced through the trade of tyres and the population was thought to be established at the company site but does not appear to be spreading. It was detected in Switzerland in 2008 following reports of a biting nuisance and subsequent surveys revealed a 1,400 km colonised zone including an area in Germany. This was the first detection of invasive mosquitoes spreading in central Europe. No obvious route of introduction was identified in this study but it is suspected that the species has been present here for some time. Adult Ae. japonicus were then found in southern Germany during 2011, following intensified surveillance. This resulted in surveillance expanding to cover the entire federal state of Baden-Württemberg where a reduction in the colonised areas compared to 2010 was reported (possibly due to a dry spring during 2011). However, a large, newly infested area was also reported from the city of Stuttgart to the Swabian Mountains. Entomological surveys carried out during 2012 in North Rhine-Westphalia also revealed the presence of an established population in the west of the country. Aedes japonicus were then reported further north in southern Lower Saxony and northeastern North Rhine-Westphalia during spring 2013. It was detected in 2012 and 2013 in Lelystad, the Netherlands.

Source: The map shows the current known distribution of Aedes japonicus in Europe at at ‘regional’ administrative level (NUTS3), as of August 2019 (ECDC & EFSA, 2019).

Possible future expansion

It is suggested that Aedes japonicus may expand beyond its current geographical distribution but there is still a lack of information available on this invasive mosquito species.

Worldwide distribution

References

  • ECDC & EFSA, 2019. European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control and European Food Safety Authority. Mosquito maps [internet]. Stockholm: ECDC; 2019. Available from: https://ecdc.europa.eu/en/disease-vectors/surveillance-and-disease-data/mosquito-maps
  • GBIF, 2019. Aedes japonicus (Theobald, 1901) in GBIF Secretariat (2019). GBIF Backbone Taxonomy. Checklist dataset https://doi.org/10.15468/39omei [accessed 2020-04-08]
  • Ministère de la Santé, 2018. Première apparition du moustique japonais « Aedes japonicus » au Luxembourg. Communiqué de presse du 1er août 2018. [PDF 40 KB]
  • MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2020. Aedes japonicus (Theobald, 1901) in MNHNL-mdata, online portal combining species observation from Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist and GBIF. National Museum of Natural History, Luxembourg. URL: https://mdata.mnhn.lu [accessed 2020-04-08]
  • Ries, C., A. Arendt, C. Braunert, S. Christian, A. Dohet, A. Frantz, G. Geimer, M. Hellers, J. A. Massard, X. Mestdagh, R. Proess, N. Schneider & M. Pfeiffenschneider, 2017. Environmental impact assessment and black, watch and alert list classification after the ISEIA Protocol of invertebrates in Luxembourg. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 119: 63-70. [PDF 360 KB]
  • Schaffner, F., 2018. Le moustique Aedes japonicus au Luxembourg : État des connaissances au 10 octobre 2018. Rapport de mission pour la Direction de la santé, grand-duché de Luxembourg. 14 p. [PDF 1.4 MB]
  • Schaffner, F. & C. Ries, 2019. First evidence and distribution of the invasive alien mosquito Aedes japonicus (Theobald, 1901) in Luxembourg. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 121: 169-183. [PDF 8,94 MB]
  • Wikipedia contributors, 2020. ‘Aedes japonicus’ in Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. URL: https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Aedes_japonicus&oldid=940631744 [accessed 2020.04.08]

 Page content last updated on 2020-05-08. Last proofread by Caroline Grounds on 2019-12-04.

Orconectes immunis (Hagen, 1870)

English Papershell crayfish Status LU: absent.
Lëtzebuergesch Kalikokriibs Status EU: established.
Français Ecrevisse calicot RA: ISEIA: A0, Alert List. Harmonia+: n/a.
Deutsch Kalikokrebs Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English - Orconectes immunis  Wikipedia - Français - Ecrevisse calicot Wikipedia - Deutsch - Kalikokrebs Nederlands - Calicotrivierkreeft | Wikispecies: n/a (2020)
Nederlands Calicotrivierkreeft Back to the list of invertebrates

Brief description

Orconectes immunis Kalikokrebs calico crayfishOrconectes immunis is a species of crayfish in the family Cambaridae. It is native to North America and it is an introduced species in Europe. O. immunis is only found in slow-flowing bodies of water, such as streams, ponds, marshes and roadside ditches, in contrast to O. virilis which also lives in rivers with moderate flow. It can survive in areas with large fluctuations in the amount of available water, by burrowing into the ground when the surface waters recede. Orconectes immunis has been popular in the aquarium trade in Germany, and is kept as a pet both in aquaria and garden ponds. The first recorded escape was a single individual in a small canal in the Rhine valley of Baden-Württemberg in 1997. It appears to be outcompeting another invasive species, Orconectes limosus, which has been present in the area for five decades (Wikipedia contributors 2018).

Status and distribution in Luxembourg

Orconectes immunis (Hagen, 1870) has not yet been documented in Luxembourg (MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF 2020). The species is spreading in several neighbouring countries as France and Germany (cf. Albes 2019).

Risk assessment

ISEIA protocol

A0 (3+3+3+2) = Alert List (Ries et al. 2017: 68).

Harmonia+ protocol

Not assessed yet.

Worldwide distribution

Bibliography

  • Albes, J., 2019. Invasoren mit Scheren – Der amerikanische Kalikokrebs vermehrt sich rasant im Rheintal – Für die hiesige Tierwelt eine Katastrophe. Journal 2019-12-11: 18. [PDF 168 KB]
  • GBIF 2020. Orconectes immunis (Hagen, 1870) in GBIF Secretariat (2019). GBIF Backbone Taxonomy. Checklist dataset https://doi.org/10.15468/39omei [accessed 2020-03-13]
  • MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2020. Orconectes immunis in MNHNL-mdata, online portal combining species observation from Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist and GBIF. National Museum of Natural History, Luxembourg. URL: https://mdata.mnhn.lu [accessed 2020-03-13]
  • Ries, C., A. Arendt, C. Braunert, S. Christian, A. Dohet, A. Frantz, G. Geimer, M. Hellers, J. A. Massard, X. Mestdagh, R. Proess, N. Schneider & M. Pfeiffenschneider, 2017. Environmental impact assessment and black, watch and alert list classification after the ISEIA Protocol of invertebrates in Luxembourg. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 119: 63-70. [PDF 360 KB]
  • Wikipedia contributors, 2018. ‘Orconectes immunis’, Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 14 October 2018, 18:38 UTC, <https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Orconectes_immunis&oldid=864041343> [accessed 2020-03-13]

 Page content last updated on 2020-05-04.

Dicranopalpus ramosus (Simon, 1909)

English n/a Status LU: established. 1st record:2007.
Lëtzebuergesch Streckfouss Status EU: established.
Français n/a RA: ISEIA: C2. Harmonia+: n/a.
Deutsch Streckfuß Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English - Dicranopalpus ramosus Wikipedia - Français - Dicranopalpus ramosus Wikipedia - Deutsch - Nederlands - Strekpoot | Wikispecies: n/a (2020)
Nederlands Strekpoot Back to the list of invertebrates

Brief description

4139 Dicranopalpus ramosusOriginally the species was found in Morocco. Later it spread into Europe, with first reports in Portugal (1948), where it spread to Spain (1965) and France (1969). The Netherlands were reached in 1992. Since 2004 it is known to occur in Germany. As early as 1957, it was reported in Bournemouth, southern England, from where it spread all over the island, reaching Scotland in 2000. In 2010, one occurrence in Denmark was documented (Wikipedia contributors 2019).

Status and distribution in Luxembourg

Records of Dicranopalpus ramosus (Simon, 1909) in Luxembourg. Data source: Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2020-05-25.

Dicranopalpus ramosus (Simon, 1909) was first documented by Dieter Weber on 18 August 2007 in the railway tunnel near Junglinster (MNHNL 2000-).

Currently, 5 records of the species are accessible through the MNHNL-mdata portal (MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF 2019).

While it appears to be widespread in the Gutland, the species seems to be largely missing in the Ösling (Muster & Meyer 2014: 38-39).

Risk assessment

ISEIA protocol

C2 (2+2+2+1) (Ries et al. 2017: 68).

Harmonia+ protocol

Not assessed yet.

Worldwide distribution

Bibliography

  • GBIF, 2020. Dicranopalpus ramosus in GBIF Secretariat (2019). GBIF Backbone Taxonomy. Checklist dataset https://doi.org/10.15468/39omei [accessed 2020-03-05]
  • MNHNL, 2000-. Dicranopalpus ramosus (Simon, 1909) in Recorder-Lux, database on the natural heritage of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. Musée national d’histoire naturelle, Luxembourg. URL: https://mdata.mnhn.lu [Accessed 2019-10-24]
  • MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2019. Dicranopalpus ramosus (Simon, 1909) in MNHNL-mdata, online portal combining species observation from Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist and GBIF. National Museum of Natural History, Luxembourg. URL: https://mdata.mnhn.lu [Accessed 2019-10-24]
  • Muster, C. & M. Meyer, 2014. Verbreitungsatlas der Weberknechte des Großherzogtums Luxemburg. Ferrantia 70, Musée national d’histoire naturelle, Luxembourg, 112 p.
  • Ries, C., A. Arendt, C. Braunert, S. Christian, A. Dohet, A. Frantz, G. Geimer, M. Hellers, J. A. Massard, X. Mestdagh, R. Proess, N. Schneider & M. Pfeiffenschneider, 2017. Environmental impact assessment and black, watch and alert list classification after the ISEIA Protocol of invertebrates in Luxembourg. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 119: 63-70. [PDF 360 KB]
  • Wikipedia contributors, 2019. Dicranopalpus ramosus (Simon, 1909) in Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 25 July 2018, 21:25 UTC, URL: https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Dicranopalpus_ramosus&oldid=851987120 [accessed 24 October 2019]

 Page content last updated on 2020-05-04.

Brigittea civica (Lucas, 1850)

English n/a Status LU: established. 1st record: 2008.
Lëtzebuergesch Biergerlech Mauerspann 1 Status EU: established.
Français n/a RA: ISEIA: C3. Harmonia+: n/a.
Deutsch Echte Mauerspinne 2 Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English - Brigittea civica Nederlands - Zuiders kaardertje | Wikispecies: n/a (2017)
Nederlands Zuiders kaardertje Back to the list of invertebrates

Brief description

Brigittea civica 02Brigittea civica (Lucas, 1850) is distributed in Europe, North Africa, Turkey, Iran and introduced to North America (Nentwig et al. 2020). In Central Europe, it is mainly known as a resident of house facades, which gave it the trivial name “wall spider”. On structured walls it spins around its hiding place, usually a recess in the plaster, a ruffled web up to the size of a palm. In this net not only the prey of the spider is caught, but also street dust, so that the settlement of even light-coloured house walls can be easily recognised from a distance (Hohner 2019). The species occurs synanthropically in central European conditions. It is well adapted to coexistence with humans, and since there is no natural enemy, it may freely redistribute (Novotný et al. 2017).

Status and distribution in Luxembourg

Records of Brigittea civica (Lucas, 1850) in Luxembourg. Data source: Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2020-05-25.

Since 2008, 30 occurrences of the species have been documented in Luxembourg in the Recorder database under it’s synonym Dictyna civica (MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF 2020). The status appears unclear and is estimated to be very common in Luxembourg. The current (2020) distribution is probably linked to the fact that the only person reporting the species is living in the Moselle area.

The status of the species seems unclear in other European countries, e.g. in the Czech Republic, where it is considered to probably be non-native; furthermore a study suggests that Brigittea civica is much more common than was previously mapped and the presence of this species in the Czech Republic was underestimated (Novotný et al. 2017).

Risk assessment

ISEIA protocol

C3 (2+1+2+1) (Ries et al. 2017: 68).

Harmonia+ protocol

Not assessed yet.

Distribution in Europe

Source: https://www.gbif.org/species/7555806

Worldwide distribution

Bibliography

  • CABI, 2019. Brigittea civica (Lucas, 1850) . In: Invasive Species Compendium. Wallingford, UK: CAB International. URL: www.cabi.org/isc [accessed 2020-03-04]
  • GBIF, 2020. Brigittea civica (Lucas, 1850) in GBIF Secretariat (2019). GBIF Backbone Taxonomy. Checklist dataset https://doi.org/10.15468/39omei [accessed 2020-03-04]
  • Hohner, M., 2019. Neue Nachweise von Brigittea civica (Araneae: Dictynidae) in Bayern. Arachnologische Mitteilungen: Arachnology Letters 57(1): 84-86.
  • MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2020. in MNHNL-mdata, online portal combining species observation from Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist and GBIF. National Museum of Natural History, Luxembourg. URL: https://mdata.mnhn.lu [Accessed 2020-03-04]
  • Nentwig W, Blick T, Bosmans R, Gloor D, Hänggi A, Kropf C, 2020. Version {2}.2020. Online at https://www.araneae.nmbe.ch. https://doi.org/10.24436/1 [Accessed 2020-03-04]
  • Novotný, B., V. Hula & J. Niedobová, 2017. Insufficiency in Distributional Faunistic Data in Synanthropic Spiders: a Case Study of the Occurrence of Brigittea Civica (Araneae, Dictynidae) in South Moravia, Czech Republic. Acta Universitatis Agriculturae et Silviculturae Mendelianae Brunensis 65(3):899-906. DOI: 10.11118/actaun201765030899
  • Ries, C., A. Arendt, C. Braunert, S. Christian, A. Dohet, A. Frantz, G. Geimer, M. Hellers, J. A. Massard, X. Mestdagh, R. Proess, N. Schneider & M. Pfeiffenschneider, 2017. Environmental impact assessment and black, watch and alert list classification after the ISEIA Protocol of invertebrates in Luxembourg. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 119: 63-70. [PDF 360 KB]
  • Wiki der Arachnologischen Gesellschaft e. V.-Bearbeiter, 2020. Brigittea civica. Wiki der Arachnologischen Gesellschaft e. V. URL: https://wiki.arages.de/index.php?title=Brigittea_civica&oldid=118852 [accessed 2020-03-05]

 Page content last updated on 2020-05-04.

DNADIVE – New research project on invasive crayfish

See the project web page at https://faune-flore.lu/dnadive/

DNADIVE aims to develop a molecular toolbox enabling eDNA detection for Invasive crayfish in streams of Luxembourg. This Public2 Partnership project was accepted by FNR in November 2017 and will start on 1st January 2018. The project will be hosted by Fondation faune-flore and its principal investigator will be the French researcher Dr David Porco. Project partnership: Luxembourg National Museum of Natural History (MNHNL), Luxembourg Institute of Science & Technology (LIST), Water management Agency (AGE), Ministry for Sustainable Development and Infrastructure (MDDI), University of Duisburg-Essen (Germany).

Abstract

DNADIVE aims to develop a toolbox for the molecular monitoring of invasive crayfish in the streams of Luxembourg. Three exotic species (Orconectes limosus, Pacifastacus leniusculus and Astacus leptodactylus) and a native one (Astacus astacus) will be targeted for the project.

This molecular toolbox will encompass several techniques of detection comprising (1) a simple amplification method easily performed in a laboratory with few elements, (2) a digital droplet amplification (ddPCR) which is a more elaborated lab method that can allow for a higher detection sensitivity and a possible quantification of DNA that could be related through the proxy of biomass and abundance to the size of the populations detected and (3) an isotherm amplification method (iPCR) i.e. a simple, cost effective approach which will allow for field detection usable by untrained individuals.

The results will enable the development of a predictive species distribution model for the target species and to infer their impact on freshwater communities through the comparison with previous sampling campaigns. This set of methods has the high potential to efficiently contribute to early detection and routine monitoring of the invasive crayfish species in Luxembourg, thus allowing for timely and efficient decision-making and appropriate management.

 Page content last updated on 2019-11-12. Last proofread by Caroline Grounds on 2019-11-12.

Luxembourg reports Nutria to the EU within the EASIN notification system

On 19th September 2017, a forester captured a Nutria (Myocastor coypus) in Osweiler (commune of Rosport, eastern Luxembourg) and put it to sleep.

The Luxembourg authorities were notified of this detection of an IAS of Union concern (Anonymous 2016) on 26 September 2017 and an Eradication Measure Set was also submitted on 26 September 2017, pursuant to Article 17(1) of R. 1143/2014 (Anonymous 2014).

Biberratte - Nutria - coypu - Myocastor coypus - ragondin - castor des marais - Mönchbruch - December 25th 2012 - 03

Coypu (Myocastor coypus), Moenchbruch lake, Hesse, Germany.
By Norbert Nagel (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

The species was first documented in Luxembourg in 1957 at the Alzette river next to Hunsdorf (Municipality of Lorentzweiler). Currently, it is only observed sporadically in Luxembourg. Because of its occurrence in the bordering regions of France (Chiers, Moselle) and Germany (Saar), it is likely that the species will populate national watercourses within the near future (Becker-Krüll & Schaefer 2013).

Bibliography

  • Anonymous, 2014. Regulation (EU) No 1143/2014 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 22 October 2014 on the prevention and management of the introduction and spread of invasive alien species. Official Journal of the European Union 4.11.2014 L 317: 35-55.
  • Anonymous, 2016. Commission implementing regulation (EU) 2016/1141 of 13 July 2016 adopting a list of invasive alien species of Union concern pursuant to Regulation (EU) No 1143/2014 of the European Parliament and of the Council. Official Journal of the European Union L 189: 4-5.
  • Becker-Krüll, L. & P. Schaefer, 2013. Jagdbare Wildtierarten Luxemburgs. Administration de la nature et des forêts, Luxembourg, 96 pp.

 Page content last updated on 2019-11-12. Last proofread by Caroline Grounds on 2019-11-12.

2016 Mosquito survey catches identified

In 2016, the Luxembourg National Natural History Museum started a survey on mosquito species in Luxembourg. Between July and October mosquitoes have been trapped on a weekly basis at 10 sites throughout the country, in co-operation with local and regional partner organizations and private individuals.

On June 14th and 15th 2017, Mosquito specialist Dr Francis Schaffner from the University of Zurich identified the 2016 catches at the Museum.

F.l.t.r.: Svenja Christian (Department of Invertebrates Zoology MNHNL) and Dr Francis Schaffner (University of Zurich) in the Lab of the Department of Ecology. Photo: Dr Christian Ries, MNHNL, 15 June 2017.

Results

182 mosquitoes were caught during 90 catches from 10 sites.

Culex pipiens / torrentium (9 out of 10 sites)
175
Anopheles plumbeus (Kockelscheuer, Steinsel)
3
Culiseta annulata (Remerschen)
1
Coquillettidia richiardii (Remerschen)
1
Aedes vexans (Kockelscheuer)
1
Aedes cinereus (Kockelscheuer) 1

Locality, Partners (#Catches|#Specimen)

We thank the following partners who have run the traps on their sites.

  • Diekirch, Administration de la nature et des forêts (11|0)
  • Esch-sur-Sûre, Naturpark Öewersauer (PNHS) (12|9)
  • Kalborn-Moulin, natur&ëmwelt – Fondation Hëllef fir d’Natur (10|6)
  • Kockelscheier, natur&ëmwelt – Haus vun der Natur (11|48)
  • Leudelange, private owner (10|27)
  • Lintgen, private owner (9|23)
  • Luxembourg / Grund, MNHNL (11|19)
  • Remerschen, Biodiversum (5|16)
  • Schrassig, private owner (6|24)
  • Steinsel, private owner (5|10)

 Page content last updated on 2019-11-12. Last proofread by Caroline Grounds on 2019-11-12.