Category Archives: Neozoa

2016 Mosquito survey catches determined

In 2016, the Luxembourg National Natural History Museum has started a survey on mosquito species in Luxembourg. Between July and October mosquitoes have been weekly trapped on 10 sites throughout the country, in co-operation with local and regional partner organizations and private persons.

On June 14th and 15th 2017, Mosquito specialist Dr Francis Schaffner from University of Zurich determined the 2016 catches at the Museum.

F.l.t.r.: Svenja Christian (Department of Invertebrates Zoology MNHNL) and Dr Francis Schaffner (University of Zurich) in the Lab of the Department of Ecology. Photo: Dr Christian Ries, MNHNL, 15 June 2016.

Results

182 mosquitoes were caught during 90 catches from 10 sites.

Culex pipiens / torrentium (9 out of 10 sites)
175
Anopheles plumbeus (Kockelscheuer, Steinsel)
3
Culiseta annulata (Remerschen)
1
Coquillettidia richiardii (Remerschen)
1
Aedes vexans (Kockelscheuer)
1
Aedes cinereus (Kockelscheuer) 1

Locality, Partners (#Catches|#Specimen)

We thank the following partners who have run the traps on their sites.

  • Diekirch, Administration de la nature et des forêts (11|0)
  • Esch-sur-Sûre, Naturpark Öewersauer (PNHS) (12|9)
  • Kalborn-Moulin, natur&ëmwelt – Fondation Hëllef fir d’Natur (10|6)
  • Kockelscheier, natur&ëmwelt – Haus vun der Natur (11|48)
  • Leudelange, private owner (10|27)
  • Lintgen, private owner (9|23)
  • Luxembourg / Grund, MNHNL (11|19)
  • Remerschen, Biodiversum (5|16)
  • Schrassig, private owner (6|24)
  • Steinsel, private owner (5|10)

Pectinatella magnifica (Leidy, 1851)

English n/a ISEIA-LUX code: C1
Lëtzebuergesch n/a EASIN
Français Pectinatelle Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English - Greater duckweed Wikipedia - Français - Lentille d'eau géante Wikipedia - Deutsch - Vielwurzelige Teichlinse Nederlands
Deutsch Schwammartiges Moostierchen Wikispecies: Wikispecies - Pectinatella magnifica
Nederlands n/a Back to the list of invertebrates

Importance and distribution in Luxembourg

In 2012 numerous colonies of Pectinatella magnifica (Leidy, 1851) (Bryozoa, Phylactolaemata) were discovered in the reservoir of Esch-sur-Sûre (Luxembourg) fed by the river Sûre. The colonies were particularly abundant in the shallow, warm and nutrient rich water near the riverbank, but some colonies were spotted by divers in the reservoir at a depth of 8-9 m in one site and more than 20 m in another site. There is reliable evidence, that Pectinatella was present, but less conspicuous and not identified as such, in 2011 and possibly already in 2010. P. magnifica was hitherto unrecorded from Luxembourg, but known from a site near the German-Luxembourg border near Nennig (Germany, Saarland) where statoblasts were found in 2001 (Massard et al. 2013).

Bibliography concerning Luxembourg

Massard, J.A., G. Geimer & E. Wille, 2013. Apparition de Pectinella magnifica (Leidy, 1851) (Bryozoa, Phylactolaemata) dans le lac de barrage d’Esch-sur-Sûre (Luxembourg). Bulletin de la Société des naturalistes luxembourgeois 114: 131-148.

Varroa destructor Anderson & Trueman, 2000

English Varroa mite ISEIA-LUX code: A3 – Black list
Lëtzebuergesch n/a EASIN
Français Varroa destructor Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English - Varroa mite Wikipedia - Français - Varroa destructor Wikipedia - Deutsch - Varroamilbe Nederlands
Deutsch Varroamilbe Wikispecies: Wikispecies - Varroa destructor
Nederlands Varroamijt Back to the list of invertebrates

Importance and distribution in Luxembourg

Varroa destructor has been observed in 1985 for the first time in Luxembourg (Meisch 1986). Since then it has spread throughout the country and is nowadays present in every beehive.

Bibliography concerning Luxembourg

  • Meisch, C., 1986. Die Varroamilbe. Geschichte der Ausbreitung, Portrait und Biologie. Pp. 174-177 in: Livre d’or du centenaire 1886-1986. Fédération des unions d’apiculteurs du grand-duché de Luxembourg.

Opilio canestrinii (Thorell, 1876)

English n/a  ISEIA-LUX code: B3 – Watch list
Lëtzebuergesch n/a EASIN
Français n/a Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English - Opilio canestrinii  Wikipedia - Français - Opilio canestrinii Wikipedia - Deutsch - Apenninenkanker Nederlands
Deutsch Apenninen-Kanker Wikispecies: n/a (2017)
Nederlands Rode hooiwagen Back to the list of invertebrates

Importance and distribution in Luxembourg

Distribution map of Opilio canestrinii (Thorell, 1876) in Luxembourg. Recorder database, MNHNL, 19.09.2017.

Opilio canestrinii is the second most common harvestman in Luxembourg and can be found in every region of the country.

Opilio canestrinii colonises a number of open habitats independently of their moisture. It is very successful in man-made landscapes, even in bigger cities. It is a strong competitor for native species and seems able to displace or even replace those. There are indices that the similar Opilio parietinus, traditionally a common species on house walls, has nearly vanished just a few years after the arrival of O. canestrinii.

Several sources describe this harvestman as a typical species of urban areas. In Luxembourg however, the data provided from different projects show evidence that the species occurs in great number and important percentages even in close-to-nature areas. Since the sixties, O. canestrinii has spread extremely quickly northwards through Europe and has become a more or less common species in his new areas.

Bibliography concerning Luxembourg

  • Muster, C. & M. Meyer, 2014. Verbreitungsatlas der Weberknechte des Großherzogtums Luxemburg. Ferrantia 70. Musée national d’histoire naturelle, Luxembourg, 112 S. (PDF 3.8 MB)
  • Weber, D. (Hrsg.), 2014. Die Höhlenfauna Luxemburgs. Ferrantia 69. Musée national d’histoire naturelle Luxembourg, 408 pp. + CD-Rom (PDF 19 MB)

Leiobunum spp.

English Daddy long legs ISEIA-LUX code: C2 – No list attribution
Lëtzebuergesch n/a EASIN
Français Leiobunum Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English - Leiobunum Wikipedia - Français - Wikipedia - Deutsch - Namenloser Rückenkanker Nederlands
Deutsch Namenloser Rückenkanker  Wikispecies: n/a
Nederlands n/a Back to the list of invertebrates

Importance and distribution in Luxembourg

Distribution map of Leiobunum blackwalli in Luxembourg. Recorder database, MNHNL, 19.09.2017.

Since probably 2000, a completely unknown harvestman started its quick expansion through Central Europe. The species could be classified in the genus Leiobunum, but is different from other European species. It is assumed that it arrived with ships from oversea, probably reaching the Netherlands first. It is still unknown where exactly it came from.

Leiobunum species generally tend to cluster together during daytimes. This behaviour is even stronger pronounced in the species in question. Mass aggregations of several hundreds of individuals have been observed.

The species was first documented for Luxembourg in 2009 (M. Meyer & C. Muster). Big clusters of the species (100-200 animals) have been observed in Rodange and Esch-sur-Alzette in the south of the country. The other findings were individuals or small groups of at most 10 animals. The species is common in the Gutland area while largely missing in the Oesling (Muster & Meyer 2014).

Many observations show that in spite of its high reproduction rate this “new” Leiobunum species seems to coexist well with indigenous species and integrates in the native fauna without greater damages. But surely great colonies of the species compete for food with other similar predators.

Bibliography concerning Luxembourg

Distribution map of Leiobunum religiosum in Luxembourg. Recorder database, MNHNL, 19.09.2017.

  • Muster, C. & M. Meyer, 2014. Verbreitungsatlas der Weberknechte des Großherzogtums Luxemburg, Ferrantia 70. Musée national d’histoire naturelle, Luxembourg, 112 S. (PDF 3.8 MB)

Dicranopalpus ramosus (Simon, 1909)

English n/a ISEIA-LUX code: C2 – No list attribution
Français n/a Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English - Dicranopalpus ramosus Wikipedia - Français - Dicranopalpus ramosus Wikipedia - Deutsch - Streckfuss Nederlands
Deutsch Streckfuss Wikispecies: n/a
Nederlands Strekpoot Back to the list of invertebrates

Importance and distribution in Luxembourg

Distribution map of somethingelse in Luxembourg. Recorder database, MNHNL, 19.09.2017.

Dicranopalpus ramosus was first documented for Luxembourg in 2007 in Beaufort (Svenja Christian) and Junglinster (D. Weber/A. Staudt). The occurrences are documented in the Recorder database.

Dicranopalpus ramosus is really easy to recognize. Its posture of outstretching its four legs parallel on both body sites is strikingly different from native and other foreign species resting positions. Further more, no other species occurring in Luxembourg has bifurcated-looking pedipalps. D. ramosus has shown an extremely quick expansion in Western Europe and Britain and has rapidly become quite common in synanthropic areas. The species however does not seem to build up large populations and – unlike other foreign species – seems to have only little affects on indigenous species collectives. Some experts suppose that climate change may have promoted the expansion of D. ramosus.

Bibliography concerning Luxembourg

  • Muster, C. & M. Meyer, 2014. Verbreitungsatlas der Weberknechte des Großherzogtums Luxemburg, Ferrantia 70, Musée national d’histoire naturelle, Luxembourg, 112 S. (PDF 3.8 MB)
  • Weber, D. (Hrsg.), 2014. Die Höhlenfauna Luxemburgs. Ferrantia 69, Musée national d’histoire naturelle Luxembourg, 408 pp. + CD-Rom (PDF 19 MB)

Dermacentor marginatus Leach, 1815

English Sheep tick ISEIA-LUX code: C1 – No list attribution
Lëtzebuergesch n/a EASIN
Français n/a Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English - Sheep tick Wikipedia - Français - Dermacentor marginatus Wikipedia - Deutsch - Schafzecke Nederlands
Deutsch Schafzecke Wikispecies: Wikispecies - Dermacentor marginatus
Nederlands  n/a Back to the list of invertebrates

Importance and distribution in Luxembourg

Distribution map of Dermacentor marginatus Leach, 1815 in Luxembourg. Recorder database, MNHNL, 19.09.2017.

The tick Dermacentor marginatus was first documented for Luxembourg by Svenja Christian on 17th November 2015 in Wellenstein (Municipality of Schengen) near the Moselle valley.

Preferring dryer and warmer climate, this tick species is very likely to benefit from climate warming.

Cheiracanthium punctorium (Villers, 1789)

English Yellow sac spider ISEIA-LUX code: C2 – No list attribution
Lëtzebuergesch n/a EASIN
Français Chiroconthe ponctu Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English - Yellow sac spider Wikipedia - Français - Chiroconthe ponctu Wikipedia - Deutsch - Ammen-Dornfinger Wikipedia - Nederlands - Grote bermzakspin
Deutsch Ammen-Dornfinger Wikispecies: Wikispecies - Cheiracanthium punctorium
Nederlands Grote bermzakspin Back to the list of invertebrates

Importance and distribution in Luxembourg

Cheiracanthium punctorium was first documented in 1988 at the nature conservation reserve Aarnescht near Oberanven, municipality of Niederanven (Hermann 1998). Only two observations of the species are documented in the Recorder database, the first from 2000 (Aarnescht near Oberanven, municipality of Niederanven), the second from 2014 (Haard, municipality of Dudelange).

Cheiracanthium punctorium lives in grasslands with preferably high-growing stalks. The species is rather thermophile and therefore geographically restricted to the south of Luxembourg. Most observations have been made in dry grassland in the Moselle-valley. Climate warming may favour further spread of the species. Being rather similar to several native Cheiracanthium species in its biology, C. punctorium should have no greater influence on the composition of native prey species in a colonised biotope. There may however be a certain competition with similar predators.

The species is known as quite aggressive when disturbed, especially pregnant or egg-protecting females. The chelicerae (fangs) of bigger individuals can easily penetrate through human skin and inject their venom. A bite of C. punctorium is painful and causes itching and swellings, sometimes stronger reactions like vertigo, nausea, shivering, circulatory collapse and light fever. The symptoms usually decline after 24-30 hours. As the species leads a rather hidden life-style, the probability for bites should be rather small. There is a certain, but unfortunately sometimes overstated, media exposure of the species and its venomousness.

Bibliography concerning Luxembourg

  • Hermann, E., 1998. Die Spinnen (Araneae) ausgewählter Halbtrockenrasen im Osten Luxemburgs. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 99: 189-199. [PDF 165KB]
  • Schneider, N., 2003. Auf Spurensuche. 22. Op der Aarnescht. Regulus 12/03: 22
  • Thiel, M., 2016. Ein unheimlicher Zuwanderer. Eine südeuropäische Giftspinne zieht zunehmend nach Norden. Luxemburger Wort, 14.9.2016.

Argiope bruennichi (Scopoli, 1772)

English Wasp spider ISEIA-LUX code: C3 – No list attribution
Lëtzebuergesch n/a EASIN
Français Argiope frelon  Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English - Wasp spider Wikipedia - Français - Argiope frelon Wikipedia - Deutsch - Wespenspinne Nederlands
Deutsch Wespenspinne  Wikispecies: Wikispecies - Ambrosia artemisiifolia
Nederlands Wespspin Back to the list of invertebrates

Importance and distribution in Luxembourg

Distribution map of Argiope bruennichi (Scopoli, 1772) in Luxembourg. Recorder database, MNHNL, 19.09.2017.

34 occurrences of the species are documented for Luxembourg in the Recorder database. Dr Feltgen first observed the species on 24.08.1906 in a garden in Lintgen (Weinachter 1906). The species can be considered as widespread in the Grand-Duchy.

On sites where this strikingly marked spider occurs, the individual number can be very high. Argiope bruennichi populations might be a certain threat for rare species of their favourite prey and  provoke changes in invertebrate communities of conquered sites. However the spider seems to integrate rather well in invaded countries, causing no great damages. The rapid spread of the species across Europe is generally thought to be facilitated by climate warming.

Argiope_bruennichi_Belgrad_060714

Argiope bruennichi in a pasture near Frisange (14.07.2006)

Bibliography concerning Luxembourg

  • Weinachter, P., 1906. Comptes Rendus des Séances Fauna 16, 10: 215 (Original article at eluxembourgensia).
  • Weiss, J., 1992. Die Ecke des Naturbeobachters. Regulus 3/92: 96-97