Asclepias syriaca L.

This species is under work

English Common milkweed Status LU: n/a. 1st record: n/a
Lëtzebuergesch Gewéinlech Seidplanz Status EU: established. IAS of Union concern (2017)
Français Asclépiade commune RA: ISEIA: B0, Alert list. Harmonia+: 0.26
Deutsch Gewöhnliche Seidenpflanze Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English Wikipedia - Français Wikipedia - Deutsch Wikipedia - Nederlands | Wikispecies: Wikispecies | CABI
Nederlands Gewoon zijdeplant Back to the list of neophytes

Brief description

Asclepias syriaca sl 2

Asclepias syriaca on ballast near Karnabrunn, district Korneuburg, Lower Austria. Photo: Stefan.lefnaer, 30 June 2012. commons.wikimedia.org

Asclepias syriaca L. originates from North America and is cultivated as an ornamental. It was introduced into European countries from France to Bulgaria and Russia (potentially invasive) (EPPO 2019). A. syriaca colonises a variety of communities from woodlands to cleared grasslands and marshlands. It grows in clumps or patches in meadows, fencerows, roadsides, railways, waste places, reduced-tillage fields, and other open habitats (CABI 2010). Larger populations can displace native plant and animal species, especially if the species penetrates into habitats worthy of protection. The large leaves shade the soil and thus prevent the emergence of other species (Anonymous 2014).

In 2014, Switzerland added Asclepias syriaca L. to its List of Invasive Alien Plants (EPPO 2019, Anonymous 2014).

Status and distribution in Luxembourg

Asclepias syriaca L. has not yet been observed in Luxembourg.

Risk assessment

ISEIA protocol

B0 (3+2+2+2) = Alert List. First assessed 22 November 2019 by Christian Ries.

Harmonia+ protocol

Overall risk score 0,26 = (Overall Invasion score 0,52 x Overall Impact score 0,50) (Ries et al. in prep.).

Worldwide distribution

Bibliography

  • Anonymous, 2014. Asclepias syriaca in: Info Flora – Das nationale Daten- und Informationszentrum der Schweizer Flora. URL: https://www.infoflora.ch/de/assets/content/documents/neophyten/inva_ascl_syr_d.pdf
  • CABI, 2010. Asclepias syriaca L. [original text by Claire Teeling]. In: Invasive Species Compendium. Wallingford, UK: CAB International. URL: www.cabi.org/isc [accessed 2019-11-22]
  • EPPO, 2019. EPPO Global Database: Asclepias syriaca L. URL: https://gd.eppo.int [accessed 2019-11-22]
  • Ries, C., Y. Krippel & M. Pfeiffenschneider, [in prep.]. Risk assessment after the Harmonia+ protocol of invasive alien vascular plant species in Luxembourg.

 Page content last updated on 2019-11-27. Last proofread by Caroline Grounds on 2019-11-27.

Lysichiton americanus Hultén & H. St. John

English American skunk-cabbage, swamp lantern Status LU: n/a. 1st record: n/a
Lëtzebuergesch Amerikanesch Heckepëppchen Status EU: established. IAS of Union concern (2016)
Français Lysichiton américain RA: ISEIA: B0 – Alert List. Harmonia+: 0,14
Deutsch Amerikanischer Stinktierkohl Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English - American skunk-cabbage Wikipedia - Français - Lysichiton américain Wikipedia - Deutsch - Amerikanischer Stinktierkohl Wikipedia - Nederlands - Moeraslantaarn | Wikispecies: Wikispecies - Lysichiton americanus | CABI
Nederlands Moeraslantaarn Back to the list of neophytes

Brief description

Lysichiton americanus Hultén & H. St. John grows in the transition zone of terrestrial, semi-aquatic and aquatic habitats like swamps, fens, wet meadows, marshy and alluvial woodlands, along streams, riverbanks, lakesides and ponds. It has no specific site condition requirements except the presence of saturated organic soils. It is often found in protected semi-natural habitats. Lysichiton reproduces almost exclusively by seeds, which may be dispersed downstream along waterways. However, spread by natural means is not frequent and rather limited. L. americanus has become established locally in swamp forests and associated wetlands in the EPPO region (resulting most of the time from plantation in the site). After some years, its huge leaves build a dense layer excluding light from native species which are usually not adapted to extreme darkness. It can displace and cause local extinction of rare species of mosses and vascular plants (Carex echinata, Viola palustris, and orchids). (Branquart et al. 2010).

Status and distribution in Luxembourg

Lysichiton americanus Hultén & H. St. John has not yet been observed in Luxembourg.

Risk assessment

ISEIA protocol

A0 (2+3+3+2) = Alert List. First assessed 24 January 2019 by Manou Pfeiffenschneider and Christian Ries.

Harmonia+ protocol

Overall risk score 0,14 = (Overall Invasion score 0,34 x Overall Impact score 0,40) (Ries et al. in prep.).

Bibliography

  • Branquart, E., I. Stiers, S. Vanderhoeven, W. Van Landuyt, F. Van Rossum & F. Verloove, 2010. Harmonia database: Lysichiton americanus Hultén & H. St. John. Harmonia version 1.2, Belgian Forum on Invasive Species. URL: http://ias.biodiversity.be [accessed on 2019-11-21]
  • Ries, C., Y. Krippel & M. Pfeiffenschneider, [in prep.]. Risk assessment after the Harmonia+ protocol of invasive alien vascular plant species in Luxembourg.

 Page content last updated on 2019-11-21. Last proofread by Caroline Grounds on 2019-11-19.

Ludwigia peploides (Kunth.) P.H. Raven

English Creeping water primrose Status LU: n/a. 1st record: n/a
Lëtzebuergesch Krauchend Waasserprimmel Status EU: established. IAS of Union concern (2016)
Français Jussie rampante RA: ISEIA: A0, Alert List. Harmonia+: 0,44
Deutsch Kriechendes Heusenkraut Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English - Creeping water primrose Wikipedia - Français - Jussie rampante Wikipedia - Nederlands - Kleine Waterteunisbloem | Wikispecies: Wikispecies - Ludwigia_peploides | CABI
Nederlands Kleine waterteunisbloem Back to the list of neophytes

Brief descritpion

Ludwigia peploides (Kunth.) P.H. Raven is an amphibious plant living in ponds, lakes, ditches, channels and slow-running rivers as well as in humid meadows. It shows a high tolerance to different water levels. Its growth is favoured by water eutrophication but the plant is able to develop in oligotrophic environments. Both clonal and sexual reproductions contribute to plant spread across watersheds. Water primroses are highly detrimental to the environment in western Europe. They quickly develop and make very thick monospecific floating carpets at the surface of water bodies. They alter the physico-chemical quality of water (reduction of light and dissolved oxygen) and possess an allelopathic activity that influences the water quality throughout the year and reduces the germination and survival rates of other plant species. They outcompete most native water plants and create an anoxic environment detrimental to many plant and animal species. In addition, they modify water flow and cause wetland drying (Branquart et al. 2013).

Status and distribution in Luxembourg

Ludwigia peploides (Kunth.) P.H. Raven has not yet been observed in Luxembourg.

Risk assessment

ISEIA protocol

A0 (3+3+2+3) = Alert List. First assessed 24 January 2019 by Manou Pfeiffenschneider and Christian Ries.

Harmonia+ protocol

Overall risk score 0,44 = (Overall Invasion score 0,59 x Overall Impact score 0,75) (Ries et al. in prep.).

Bibliography

  • Branquart, E., S. Vanderhoeven, W. Van Landuyt, F. Van Rossum & F. Verloove, 2013. Harmonia database: Ludwigia peploides (Kunth.) P.H. Raven. Harmonia version 1.2, Belgian Forum on Invasive Species. URL: http://ias.biodiversity.be [accessed on 2019-11-21]
  • Ries, C., Y. Krippel & M. Pfeiffenschneider, [in prep.]. Risk assessment after the Harmonia+ protocol of invasive alien vascular plant species in Luxembourg.

 Page content last updated on 2019-11-21. Last proofread by Caroline Grounds on 2019-11-19.

Ludwigia grandiflora (Michx.) Greuter & Burdet

English Water primrose Status LU: n/a. 1st record: n/a
Lëtzebuergesch Groussbléieg Waasserprimmel Status EU: established. IAS of Union concern (2016)
Français Jussie à grandes fleurs, Grande J. RA: ISEIA: A0, Alert List. Harmonia+: 0,28
Deutsch Großblütiges Heusenkraut Wikipedia: Wikipedia - Français - Jussie à grandes fleurs Wikipedia - Deutsch - Großblütige Heusenkraut Wikipedia - Nederlands - Waterteunisbloem | Wikispecies: Wikispecies - Ludwigia_grandiflora | CABI
Nederlands Waterteunisbloem Back to the list of neophytes

Brief description

Ludwigia grandiflora (Michx.) Greuter & Burdet is an amphibious species living in ponds, lakes, ditches, channels and slow-running rivers as well as in humid meadows. It shows a high tolerance to different water levels. Its growth is favoured by water eutrophication but the plant is able to develop in oligotrophic environments. Invasive spread across watersheds is almost exclusively clonal and brought about by the dispersal of vegetative propagules by waterflow. Water primroses are highly detrimental to the environment in western Europe. They quickly develop and make very thick monospecific floating carpets at the surface of water bodies. They alter the physico-chemical quality of water (reduction of light and dissolved oxygen) and possess an allelopathic activity that influences the water quality throughout the year and reduces the germination and survival rates of other plant species. They outcompete most native water plants and create an anoxic environment detrimental to many plant and animal species. In addition, they modify water flow and cause wetland drying (Branquart et al. 2013).

Status and distribution in Luxembourg

Ludwigia grandiflora (Michx.) Greuter & Burdet has not yet been observed in Luxembourg.

Risk assessment

ISEIA protocol

A0 (3+3+2+3) = Alert List. First assessed 24 January 2019 by Manou Pfeiffenschneider and Christian Ries.

Harmonia+ protocol

Overall risk score 0,28 = (Overall Invasion score 0,46 x Overall Impact score 0,62) (Ries et al. in prep.).

Bibliography

  • Branquart, E., I. Stiers, S. Vanderhoeven, W. Van Landuyt, F. Van Rossum & F. Verloove, 2013. Harmonia database: Ludwigia grandiflora (Michx.) Greuter & Burdet. Harmonia version 1.2, Belgian Forum on Invasive Species. URL: http://ias.biodiversity.be [accessed on 2019-11-21]
  • Ries, C., Y. Krippel & M. Pfeiffenschneider, [in prep.]. Risk assessment after the Harmonia+ protocol of invasive alien vascular plant species in Luxembourg.

 Page content last updated on 2019-11-21. Last proofread by Caroline Grounds on 2019-11-19.

Aedes japonicus (Theobald, 1901)

English East Asian bush or rock pool mosquito ISEIA: C2
Lëtzebuergesch Japanesch Hecke-Moustique EASIN
Français n/a Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English - East Asian bush mosquito Wikipedia - Français Wikipedia - Deutsch - Asiatische Buschmücke Wikipedia - Nederlands
Deutsch Asiatische Buschmücke Wikispecies: n/a
Nederlands Aziatische bosmug Back to the list of invertebrates

Advice for the population

Web pages

Flyers

Status and distribution in Luxembourg

Distribution map of Aedes japonicus (Theobald, 1901) in Luxembourg. Data source: Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2019-12-06.

3 female imagoes of Aedes japonicus (Syn.: Hulecoeteomyia japonica) were captured on 4th July 2018 in Stolzembourg, Oesling. Field exploration on 1st and 2nd August showed the East Asian bush mosquito is also present in Bivels, Vianden, Wahlhausen and Gemünd (D). Further field studies in August and October 2018 revealed the presence of a large population of Aedes japonicus, detected in 16 sites distributed over 12 localities, 12 municipalities, 7 cantons and 3 districts. The colonised area can be estimated to date to cover at least 550 km², located in the east of the Grand Duchy, from the valley of the Our in the north to Ernster in the south, and as far as Kautenbach and Ettelbruck in the west. The mosquito was not detected in neighbouring Belgium (Clairefontaine and Ouren) but it was in Germany, where it has been present for several years in Rhineland-Palatinate and from where it has certainly migrated to the Grand Duchy. We also detected it in the French border town of Contz-les-Bains, which suggests that the mosquito is probably present, although not detected to date, in the region bordering the Moselle, from Manternach to the French border (Schaffner 2018).

Distribution of the mosquito Aedes japonicus known as of 10 October 2018, for Luxembourg and the neighbouring regions of Germany, Belgium and France. Purple: proven presence; Purple with star: data from the German surveillance network; Green: undetected presence. Source: Schaffner 2018.

The species is established in the Province of Namur (Belgium), in North Rhine-Westphalia, Rhineland-Palatinate and Hesse (Germany), and in Bas-Rhin, Haut-Rhin, Vosges (France).

Aedes japonicus is a mosquito species originally native to Japan, Korea and southern China, and is important for humans as a potential vector of pathogens such as the West Nile virus and of various types of encephalitis viruses.

Risk assessment

ISEIA protocol: C2 (3+2+2+1), assessment updated on 13 August 2018 by M. Pfeiffenschneider & C. Ries. Former assessment under it’s synonym Hulecoeteomyia japonica: C0 (2+1+1+1) (Ries et al. 2017: 68).

Initial importations and spread in Europe

Source: https://ecdc.europa.eu/en/disease-vectors/facts/mosquito-factsheets/aedes-japonicus [accessed July 31 2018]

Aedes japonicus was first reported in Europe in 2000 when it was detected in Normandy (Orne) in northern France, where it was later eliminated. It was then reported in 2002 in Belgium at a tyre depot and presence as adults and larvae was confirmed in 2007 and 2008. It was most likely introduced through the trade of tyres and the population was thought to be established at the company site but does not appear to be spreading. It was detected in Switzerland in 2008 following reports of a biting nuisance and subsequent surveys revealed a 1,400 km colonised zone including an area in Germany. This was the first detection of invasive mosquitoes spreading in central Europe. No obvious route of introduction was identified in this study but it is suspected that the species has been present here for some time. Adult Ae. japonicus were then found in southern Germany during 2011, following intensified surveillance. This resulted in surveillance expanding to cover the entire federal state of Baden-Württemberg where a reduction in the colonised areas compared to 2010 was reported (possibly due to a dry spring during 2011). However, a large, newly infested area was also reported from the city of Stuttgart to the Swabian Mountains. Entomological surveys carried out during 2012 in North Rhine-Westphalia also revealed the presence of an established population in the west of the country. Aedes japonicus were then reported further north in southern Lower Saxony and northeastern North Rhine-Westphalia during spring 2013. It was detected in 2012 and 2013 in Lelystad, the Netherlands.

Source: European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control: The map shows the current known distribution of Aedes japonicus in Europe at at ‘regional’ administrative level (NUTS3), as of June 2018.

Possible future expansion 

It is suggested that Aedes japonicus may expand beyond its current geographical distribution but there is still a lack of information available on this invasive mosquito species.

References

  • Ministère de la Santé, 2018. Première apparition du moustique japonais « Aedes japonicus » au Luxembourg. Communiqué de presse du 1er août 2018. [PDF 40 KB]
  • Ries, C., A. Arendt, C. Braunert, S. Christian, A. Dohet, A. Frantz, G. Geimer, M. Hellers, J. A. Massard, X. Mestdagh, R. Proess, N. Schneider & M. Pfeiffenschneider, 2017. Environmental impact assessment and black, watch and alert list classification after the ISEIA Protocol of invertebrates in Luxembourg. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 119: 63-70. [PDF 360 KB]
  • Schaffner, F., 2018. Le moustique Aedes japonicus au Luxembourg : État des connaissances au 10 octobre 2018. Rapport de mission pour la Direction de la santé, grand-duché de Luxembourg. 14 p. [PDF 1.4 MB]
  • Schaffner, F. & C. Ries, [submitted, 2019]. First evidence and distribution of the invasive alien mosquito Aedes japonicus (Theobald, 1901) in Luxembourg. Bulletin de la Société des naturalistes luxembourgeois.

 Page content last updated on 2019-12-04. Last proofread by Caroline Grounds on 2019-12-04.

Parthenocissus quinquefolia (L.) Planch.

English Five-leaved Virginia creeper ISEIA: B1 – Watch List
Lëtzebuergesch Fënnefbliedrege Wëlle Wäin EASIN
Français Vigne-vierge à cinq folioles Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English - Five-leaved Virginia creeper Wikipedia - Français - Vigne-vierge à cinq folioles Wikipedia - Deutsch - Selbstkletternde Jungfernrebe Wikipedia - Nederlands - Vijfbladige wingerd
Deutsch Selbstkletternde Jungfernrebe Wikispecies: Wikispecies - Parthenocissus quinquefolia
Nederlands Vijfbladige wingerd Back to the list of neophytes

General note on Parthenocissus spp.

Originally observed in man-made habitats, these popular garden plants can be found increasingly in natural habitats like coastal dunes, riparian habitats and wood margins (Parthenocissus inserta) or rock outcrops (Parthenocissus quinquefolia). They usually thrive on nutrient-rich soils. Seeds are dispersed over long distances by birds. With its dense growth, the plant may cover, out-compete and kill native vegetation (Branquart et al. 2011).

Status and distribution in Luxembourg

Distribution map of Parthenocissus quinquefolia (L.) Planch. in Luxembourg. Data source: Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2019-12-06.

Parthenocissus quinquefolia (L.) Planch. was first documented by Léopold Reichling (1921-2009) on 1 June 1958 at the Stromberg peak in the municipality of Schengen (MNHNL 2000-).

Currently, 12 records of the five-leaved Virginia creeper are accessible through the MNHNL-mdata portal (MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF 2019).

Parthenocissus inserta (A. Kerner) Fritsch has long been confused with Parthenocissus quinquefolia (L.) Planch. originating from North America. However, the latter is distinguished by its more branched twists (5-8 twists per twist, compared to gen. 3-5 in P. inserta), with branches provided at their end with a differentiated adhesive disc (simply swollen at their end in P. inserta) and by its leaflets with more obtuse and generally less deep teeth. A hybrid between the two species is also reported. It remains to be seen whether P. quinquefolia and the above-mentioned hybrid have been found in a subspontaneous state in the wild (Lambinon & Verloove 2012: 457).

Risk assessment

ISEIA protocol: B1 (3+3+2+2), reassessed on 10 July 2018 by C. Ries and M. Pfeiffenschneider. Originally assessed together with Parthenocissus inserta as Parthenocissus spp. C1 (1+1+1+1) (Ries et al. 2013: 18).

Bibliography

  • Branquart, E., P. Dupriez, S. Vanderhoeven, W. Van Landuyt, F. Van Rossum & F. Verloove, 2011. Harmonia database: Parthenocissus spp. Harmonia version 1.2, Belgian Forum on Invasive Species. URL: http://ias.biodiversity.be [accessed on 2019-10-14]
  • Lambinon J. & F. Verloove, 2012. Nouvelle flore de la Belgique, du grand-duché de Luxembourg, du Nord de la France et des régions voisines. Sixième édition. Avec la collaboration de L. Delvosalle, B. Toussaint, D. Geerinck, I. Hoste, F. Van Rossum, B. Cornier, R. Schumacker, A. Vanderpoorten et H. Vannerom. Jardin botanique national de Belgique, Meise. CXXXIX + 1195 pp. ISBN : 9789072619884.
  • MNHNL, 2000-. Parthenocissus quinquefolia (L.) Planch. in Recorder-Lux, database on the natural heritage of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. Musée national d’histoire naturelle, Luxembourg. URL: https://mdata.mnhn.lu [Accessed 2019-10-14]
  • MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2019. Parthenocissus quinquefolia (L.) Planch. in MNHNL-mdata, online portal combining species observation from Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist and GBIF. National Museum of Natural History, Luxembourg. URL: https://mdata.mnhn.lu [Accessed 2019-10-14]
  • Ries, C., Y. Krippel, M. Pfeiffenschneider & S. Schneider, 2013. Environmental impact assessment and black, watch and alert list classification after the ISEIA Protocol of non-native vascular plant species in Luxembourg. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 114: 15-21. [PDF 652 KB]

 Page content last updated on 2019-11-20. Last proofread by Caroline Grounds on 2019-11-20.

Parthenocissus inserta (A. Kerner) Fritsch

English False Virginia creeper ISEIA: B1 – Watch List
Lëtzebuergesch Gewéinleche Wëlle Wäin EASIN
Français Vigne vierge commune Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English - False Virginia creeper Wikipedia - Français - Vigne vierge commune Wikipedia - Deutsch - Wilder Wein Wikipedia - Nederlands - Valse wingerd
Deutsch Gewöhnliche Jungfernrebe Wikispecies: Wikispecies - Parthenocissus inserta
Nederlands Valse wingerd Back to the list of neophytes

General note on Parthenocissus spp.

Originally observed in man-made habitats, these popular garden plants can be found increasingly in natural habitats like coastal dunes, riparian habitats and wood margins (Parthenocissus inserta) or rock outcrops (Parthenocissus quinquefolia). They usually thrive on nutrient-rich soils. Seeds are dispersed over long distances by birds. With its dense growth, the plant may cover, out-compete and kill native vegetation (Branquart et al. 2011).

Status and distribution in Luxembourg

Distribution map of Parthenocissus inserta (A. Kerner) Fritsch in Luxembourg. Data source: Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2019-12-06.

The oldest herbarium specimen at the MNHNL was collected in July 1883 by Edmond Joseph Klein (1866-1942) from a cultivated false Virginia creeper in Wiltz (Specimen № 16636, MNHNL 2000-). The next scientific record that we know of was made under its synonym Parthenocissus vitacea Hitchc. by Jean-Jacques Kariger in 1957 on the Wurthsberg in the Clausen district of Luxembourg City (Kariger 1959: 74; MNHNL 2000-).

Currently, 4 records of the false Virginia creeper are accessible through the MNHNL-mdata portal (MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF 2019).

This south and western North American species is melliferous and cultivated to cover walls or facades. Quite frequently subspontaneous or naturalised locally: old walls, hedges, ruderalized forest edges, wastelands, stream banks, slag heaps, railway ballast (Lambinon & Verloove 2012: 457).

Parthenocissus inserta (A. Kerner) Fritsch has long been confused with Parthenocissus quinquefolia (L.) Planch. originating from North America. However, the latter is distinguished by its more branched twists (5-8 twists per twist, compared to gen. 3-5 in P. inserta), with branches provided at their end with a differentiated adhesive disc (simply swollen at their end in P. inserta) and by its leaflets with more obtuse and generally less deep teeth. A hybrid between the two species is also reported. It remains to be seen whether P. quinquefolia and the above-mentioned hybrid have been found in a subspontaneous state in the wild (Lambinon & Verloove 2012: 457).

Risk assessment

ISEIA protocol: B1 (3+3+2+2), reassessed on 10 July 2018 by C. Ries and M. Pfeiffenschneider. Originally assessed together with Parthenocissus quinquefolia as Parthenocissus spp. C1 (1+1+1+1) (Ries et al. 2013: 18).

Bibliography

  • Branquart, E., P. Dupriez, S. Vanderhoeven, W. Van Landuyt, F. Van Rossum & F. Verloove, 2011. Harmonia database: Parthenocissus spp. Harmonia version 1.2, Belgian Forum on Invasive Species. URL: http://ias.biodiversity.be [accessed on 2019-10-14]
  • Kariger, J.-J., 1959. Florule et capitale: Le Wurthsberg de Clausen et quelques hauteurs analogues. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 62: 59-81. [PDF 1302 KB]
  • Lambinon J. & F. Verloove, 2012. Nouvelle flore de la Belgique, du grand-duché de Luxembourg, du Nord de la France et des régions voisines. Sixième édition. Avec la collaboration de L. Delvosalle, B. Toussaint, D. Geerinck, I. Hoste, F. Van Rossum, B. Cornier, R. Schumacker, A. Vanderpoorten et H. Vannerom. Jardin botanique national de Belgique, Meise. CXXXIX + 1195 pp. ISBN : 9789072619884.
  • MNHNL, 2000-. Parthenocissus inserta (A. Kerner) Fritsch in Recorder-Lux, database on the natural heritage of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. Musée national d’histoire naturelle, Luxembourg. URL: https://mdata.mnhn.lu [Accessed 2019-10-14]
  • MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2019. Parthenocissus inserta (A. Kerner) Fritsch in MNHNL-mdata, online portal combining species observation from Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist and GBIF. National Museum of Natural History, Luxembourg. URL: https://mdata.mnhn.lu [Accessed 2019-10-14]
  • Ries, C., Y. Krippel, M. Pfeiffenschneider & S. Schneider, 2013. Environmental impact assessment and black, watch and alert list classification after the ISEIA Protocol of non-native vascular plant species in Luxembourg. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 114: 15-21. [PDF 652 KB]

 Page content last updated on 2019-11-20. Last proofread by Caroline Grounds on 2019-11-20.

Orconectes immunis (Hagen, 1870)

English Papershell crayfish
ISEIA: A0 – Alert List
Lëtzebuergesch n/a EASIN
Français Ecrevisse calicot Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English - Orconectes immunis  Wikipedia - Français - Ecrevisse calicot Wikipedia - Deutsch - Kalikokrebs Nederlands - Calicotrivierkreeft
Deutsch Kalikokrebs Wikispecies: n/a (2017)
Nederlands Calicotrivierkreeft Back to the list of invertebrates

Status and distribution in Luxembourg

The species has not yet been documented in Luxembourg.

Risk assessment

ISEIA protocol: A0 (3+3+3+2) = Alert List (Ries et al. 2017: 68).

Bibliography

  • Ries, C., A. Arendt, C. Braunert, S. Christian, A. Dohet, A. Frantz, G. Geimer, M. Hellers, J. A. Massard, X. Mestdagh, R. Proess, N. Schneider & M. Pfeiffenschneider, 2017. Environmental impact assessment and black, watch and alert list classification after the ISEIA Protocol of invertebrates in Luxembourg. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 119: 63-70. [PDF 360 KB]

 Page content last updated on 2019-10-23.

Dicranopalpus ramosus (Simon, 1909)

English n/a ISEIA: C2
Lëtzebuergesch Streckfouss EASIN
Français n/a Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English - Dicranopalpus ramosus  Wikipedia - Français - Dicranopalpus ramosus Wikipedia - Deutsch - Nederlands - Strekpoot
Deutsch Streckfuß Wikispecies: n/a (2017)
Nederlands Strekpoot Back to the list of invertebrates

Brief description

Originally the species was found in Morocco. Later it spread into Europe, with first reports in Portugal (1948), where it spread to Spain (1965) and France (1969). The Netherlands were reached in 1992. Since 2004 it is known to occur in Germany. As early as 1957, it was reported in Bournemouth, southern England, from where it spread all over the island, reaching Scotland in 2000. In 2010, one occurrence in Denmark was documented (Wikipedia contributors 2019).

Status and distribution in Luxembourg

Distribution map of Dicranopalpus ramosus (Simon, 1909) in Luxembourg. Data source: Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2019-12-06.

Dicranopalpus ramosus (Simon, 1909) was first documented by Dieter Weber on 18 August 2007 in the railway tunnel near Junglinster (MNHNL 2000-).

Currently, 5 records of the species are accessible through the MNHNL-mdata portal (MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF 2019).

While it appears to be widespread in the Gutland, the species seems to be largely missing in the Ösling (Muster & Meyer 2014: 38-39).

Risk assessment

ISEIA protocol: C2 (2+2+2+1) (Ries et al. 2017: 68).

Bibliography

  • MNHNL, 2000-. Dicranopalpus ramosus (Simon, 1909) in Recorder-Lux, database on the natural heritage of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. Musée national d’histoire naturelle, Luxembourg. URL: https://mdata.mnhn.lu [Accessed 2019-10-24]
  • MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2019. Dicranopalpus ramosus (Simon, 1909) in MNHNL-mdata, online portal combining species observation from Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist and GBIF. National Museum of Natural History, Luxembourg. URL: https://mdata.mnhn.lu [Accessed 2019-10-24]
  • Muster, C. & M. Meyer, 2014. Verbreitungsatlas der Weberknechte des Großherzogtums Luxemburg. Ferrantia 70, Musée national d’histoire naturelle, Luxembourg, 112 p.
  • Ries, C., A. Arendt, C. Braunert, S. Christian, A. Dohet, A. Frantz, G. Geimer, M. Hellers, J. A. Massard, X. Mestdagh, R. Proess, N. Schneider & M. Pfeiffenschneider, 2017. Environmental impact assessment and black, watch and alert list classification after the ISEIA Protocol of invertebrates in Luxembourg. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 119: 63-70. [PDF 360 KB]
  • Wikipedia contributors, 2019. Dicranopalpus ramosus (Simon, 1909) in Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 25 July 2018, 21:25 UTC, URL: https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Dicranopalpus_ramosus&oldid=851987120 [accessed 24 October 2019]

 Page content last updated on 2019-10-24.

Brigittea civica (Lucas, 1850)

English n/a ISEIA: C3
Lëtzebuergesch n/a EASIN
Français n/a Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English - Brigittea civica Nederlands - Zuiders kaardertje
Deutsch  n/a Wikispecies: n/a (2017)
Nederlands Zuiders kaardertje Back to the list of invertebrates

Status and distribution in Luxembourg

Distribution map of Brigittea civica (Lucas, 1850) in Luxembourg. Data source: Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2019-12-06.

29 occurrences of the species have been documented in Luxembourg in the Recorder database under it’s synonym Dictyna civica (Status: July 2018). The species is estimated to be very common.

Risk assessment

ISEIA protocol: C3 (2+1+2+1) (Ries et al. 2017: 68).

Bibliography

  • Ries, C., A. Arendt, C. Braunert, S. Christian, A. Dohet, A. Frantz, G. Geimer, M. Hellers, J. A. Massard, X. Mestdagh, R. Proess, N. Schneider & M. Pfeiffenschneider, 2017. Environmental impact assessment and black, watch and alert list classification after the ISEIA Protocol of invertebrates in Luxembourg. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 119: 63-70. [PDF 360 KB]

 Page content last updated on 2018-07-10.