Leiobunum sp.

English n/a Status LU: established. 1st record: ?
Lëtzebuergesch n/a Status Eur.: established. 1st record: ~2000 (NL).
Français n/a RA: ISEIA: C2. Harmonia+: n/a.
Deutsch Namenloser Rückenkanker Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English - Leiobunum Wikipedia - Deutsch - Namenloser Rückenkanker Nederlands | Wikispecies: n/a (2020)
Nederlands n/a Back to the list of invertebrates

Brief description

Mainz fg03Since probably 2000, a completely unknown harvestman started its quick expansion through Central Europe. The species could be classified in the genus Leiobunum, but is different from other European species. It has been named provisionally as Leiobunum sp. (sensu Wijnhoven et al. 2007). It is assumed that it arrived with ships from overseas, probably reaching the Netherlands first. It is still unknown exactly where it came from (Wijnhoven et al. 2007).

The area of origin is unknown to date, since about 2000 the species has probably spread from the Netherlands into Western Germany on both sides of the Rhine valley to Switzerland and Vorarlberg (Wijnhoven et al. 2007), in the meantime also to Schleswig-Holstein (Staudt 2012).

Habitat: Primarily possibly a rock dweller, in Europe in habitats of anthropogenic origin: industrial wastelands, ruins and house walls (Wijnhoven et al. 2007). Leiobunum sp. generally tend to cluster together during the day. This behaviour is even more pronounced in the species in question. Mass aggregations of several hundreds of individuals have been observed. Many observations show that in spite of its high reproduction rate this “new” Leiobunum sp. seems to coexist well with indigenous species and integrates in the native fauna without great damage. But surely great colonies of the species compete for food with other similar predators.

Status and distribution in Luxembourg

Distribution map of Leiobunum sp. in Luxembourg. Source: Muster & Meyer 2014: 80.

No records of Leiobunum sp. (sensu Wijnhoven et al. 2007) are present in the MNHNL-mdata portal (MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2020).

Already widespread in the Gutland, Leiobunum sp. still largely absent in the Ösling (Muster & Meyer 2014: 79). In Luxembourg exclusively synanthropic, larger aggregations have so far only been observed on industrial ruins in the Minette area, in small numbers of individuals in many places on average house walls.

Remarks (Muster & Meyer 2014: 82): Due to the occurrence of mass aggregations with > 1000 specimens the species became the focus of media and sensation-hungry public after 2007. Suddenly, weavers were the focus of exhibitions, local publications, radio and television broadcasts. Wijnhoven et al. (2007) also warned urgently of an imminent invasion of unprecedented proportions and possible dramatic effects on the native opilionid fauna. A few years after this initial uncertainty, the situation is now much more relaxed. Despite the now widespread distribution in Luxembourg, no mass increases could be registered. Only in the former Goodyear test site near Esch-sur-Alzette and at industrial ruins near Rodange larger colonies of 100-200 specimens were sighted. Otherwise only smaller groups of maximum 10 specimens were observed, often only single specimens. It was noticeable that often only one dwelling house per small village was inhabited, while other similar houses remained unoccupied. In this context, observations from the Ruhr area seem interesting, according to which the animals show a preference for calcareous surfaces rich in structure (Toss 2010). The effects on other weaver’s apprentice species are also likely to be less severe than originally assumed. Leiobunum rotundum is often found at or even within aggregations of the Nameless Spine Anchor, while they even seem to evade Dicranopalpus ramosus (Wijnhoven 2011).

Risk assessment

ISEIA protocol

C2 (2+2+2+1) (Ries et al. 2017: 68).

Harmonia+ protocol

Not assessed yet.

Bibliography

  • MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2020. MNHNL-mdata, online portal combining species observation from Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist and GBIF. National Museum of Natural History, Luxembourg. URL: https://mdata.mnhn.lu [Accessed 2020-03-05]
  • Muster, C. & M. Meyer, 2014. Verbreitungsatlas der Weberknechte des Großherzogtums Luxemburg, Ferrantia 70. Musée national d’histoire naturelle, Luxembourg, 112 S. [pp. 79-82] (PDF 3.8 MB)
  • Ries, C., A. Arendt, C. Braunert, S. Christian, A. Dohet, A. Frantz, G. Geimer, M. Hellers, J. A. Massard, X. Mestdagh, R. Proess, N. Schneider & M. Pfeiffenschneider, 2017. Environmental impact assessment and black, watch and alert list classification after the ISEIA Protocol of invertebrates in Luxembourg. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 119: 63-70. [PDF 360 KB]
  • Staudt, A., 2012. Nachweiskarten der Spinnentiere Deutschlands (Arachnida: Araneae, Opiliones, Pseudoscorpiones). http://www.spiderling.de/arages/
  • Toss, K., 2010. Auffällig unauffällig: Der bislang unbestimmte Weberknecht der Gattung Leiobunum ist im westlichen Ruhrgebiet weit verbreitet. Elektronische Aufsätze der Biologischen Station Westliches Ruhrgebiet 19: 1-5.
  • Wijnhoven, H., A.L. Schönhofer & J. Martens, 2007. An unidentified harvestman Leiobunum sp. alarmingly invading Europe (Arachnida: Opiliones). Arachnol. Mitt. 34: 27-38. (https://www.natur-in-nrw.de/Download/Martens_Leiobunum_2007.pdf)

 Page content last updated on 2020-03-05. Last proofread by Caroline Grounds on 2019-12-10.

Dikerogammarus villosus (Sowinsky, 1894)

English Killer shrimp Status LU: present. 1st record: 2006.
Lëtzebuergesch Killercrevette Status Eur.: established.
Français Crevette tueuse RA: ISEIA: A1, Black List. Harmonia+: n/a.
Deutsch Großer Höckerflohkrebs Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English - Killer shrimp Wikipedia - Français - Crevette tueuse Wikipedia - Deutsch - Großer Höckerflohkrebs Nederlands | Wikispecies: n/a (2020)
Nederlands Pontokaspische Vlokreeft Back to the list of invertebrates

Brief description

Dikerogammarus villosus (8740859563)Dikerogammarus villosus (Sowinsky, 1894) is a freshwater amphipod originating from the Ponto-Caspian region. Its range expansion began in the late twentieth century and was associated with re-opening of the shipping canal between the Danube River and Main River (Vaate et al., 2002). Large body size, extremely voracious predatory behaviour, high fecundity and wide environmental tolerance make this amphipod a very successful invader of European waters. Invasion of D. villosus often results in significant local reduction or even extinction of native amphipods and other macroinvertebrates on which it preys (CABI 2019).

D. villosus is included on the list of the 100 most invasive exotic species of Europe (Devin & Beisel 2009).

Status and distribution in Luxembourg

Dikerogammarus villosus (Sowinsky, 1894) was first recorded in 2006: several specimen collected on 2006-05-12 in the river Moselle near Stadtbredimus were discovered in the Museums collections in July 2021 (Weigand in litt.). Another observation was made on 2018-06-20 in the river Sure near Wasserbillig / Langsur (MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF 2021). Accordingly, the Killer shrimp has been moved from the Alert List (Ries et al. 2017: 68) to the Black List.

Risk assessment

ISEIA protocol

Following the discovery of the Killer shrimp in July 2021 in the Museums collections (Weigand in litt.), the species was reassessed on 2021-07-29 to A1 (3+2+3+3) = Black List by C. Ries. Initial assessment: A0 (3+2+3+3) = Alert List (Ries et al. 2017: 68).

Harmonia+ protocol

Not assessed yet.

Worldwide distribution

Bibliography

  • CABI, 2019. Dikerogammarus villosus. In: Invasive Species Compendium. Wallingford, UK: CAB International. URL: www.cabi.org/isc [accessed 2020-03-13]
  • Devin, S. & J.-N. Beisel, 2009. Dikerogammarus villosus (Sowinsky), killer shrimp (Gammaridae, Crustacea). In: Handbook of alien species in Europe. Springer, 309.
  • MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2021. Dikerogammarus villosus in MNHNL-mdata, online portal combining species observation from Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist and GBIF. National Museum of Natural History, Luxembourg. URL: https://mdata.mnhn.lu [accessed 2020-03-13]
  • Ries, C., A. Arendt, C. Braunert, S. Christian, A. Dohet, A. Frantz, G. Geimer, M. Hellers, J. A. Massard, X. Mestdagh, R. Proess, N. Schneider & M. Pfeiffenschneider, 2017. Environmental impact assessment and black, watch and alert list classification after the ISEIA Protocol of invertebrates in Luxembourg. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 119: 63-70. [PDF 360 KB]

 Page content last updated on 2021-07-29. Last proofread by Caroline Grounds on 2019-12-10.

Potamopyrgus antipodarum (Gray, 1843)

English New Zealand mud snail Status LU: established. 1st record: 1996.
Lëtzebuergesch Neiséilännesch Zwergdeckelschleek Status Eur.: established.
Français Hydrobie des antipodes RA: ISEIA: A3, Black List. Harmonia+: n/a.
Deutsch Neuseeländische Zwergdeckelschnecke Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English - New Zealand mud snail Wikipedia - Français - Wikipedia - Deutsch - Neuseeländische Zwergdeckelschnecke Nederlands | Wikispecies: n/a (2020) | CABI
Nederlands Jenkins’ waterhoren Back to the list of invertebrates

Brief description

New Zealand Mud snailsPotamopyrgus antipodarum (Gray, 1843) is an aquatic snail native to New Zealand. It has been introduced to Europe, North America, Australia, Iraq, Turkey and Japan. In several ecosystems it is considered invasive because it becomes highly abundant, impacting the structure and function of the invaded ecosystems. Females are parthenogenetic, meaning they can reproduce without males, so a population can be founded by a single female. Most the non-native populations are female. There can be up to six generations per year, with an average number of 230 offspring per adult per year. P. antipodarum can also tolerate desiccation for several days, which allows for rapid spread (such as by birds and fishing tools) throughout different aquatic ecosystems. In several countries, including Spain, USA and Australia, it is considered as an invasive species (CABI 2019).

Status and distribution in Luxembourg

Records of Potamopyrgus antipodarum (Gray, 1843) in Luxembourg. Data source: Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2021-09-22.

Potamopyrgus antipodarum (Gray, 1843) was first documented by Gerhard Weitmann and Klaus Groh on 17 June 1996 in the Moselle river in the municipality of Remich (MNHNL 2000-).

Currently, 52 records of the New Zealand mud snail are accessible through the MNHNL-mdata portal (MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF 2019).

Risk assessment

ISEIA protocol

A3 (3+2+3+3) = Black List (Ries et al. 2017: 68).

Harmonia+ protocol

Not assessed yet.

Worldwide distribution

Bibliography

  • CABI, 2019. Potamopyrgus antipodarum (Gray, 1843). In: Invasive Species Compendium. Wallingford, UK: CAB International. URL: www.cabi.org/isc [accessed 2020-04-21]
  • MNHNL, 2000-. Potamopyrgus antipodarum (Gray, 1843) in Recorder-Lux, database on the natural heritage of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. Musée national d’histoire naturelle, Luxembourg. URL: https://mdata.mnhn.lu [Accessed 2019-10-24]
  • MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2019. Potamopyrgus antipodarum (Gray, 1843) in MNHNL-mdata, online portal combining species observation from Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist and GBIF. National Museum of Natural History, Luxembourg. URL: https://mdata.mnhn.lu [Accessed 2019-10-24]
  • Ries, C., A. Arendt, C. Braunert, S. Christian, A. Dohet, A. Frantz, G. Geimer, M. Hellers, J. A. Massard, X. Mestdagh, R. Proess, N. Schneider & M. Pfeiffenschneider, 2017. Environmental impact assessment and black, watch and alert list classification after the ISEIA Protocol of invertebrates in Luxembourg. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 119: 63-70. [PDF 360 KB]

 Page content last updated on 2020-04-21.

Sinanodonta woodiana (Lea, 1834)

English Chinese pond mussel Status LU: absent.
Lëtzebuergesch Chinesesch Weiermuschel Status Eur.: established.
Français Anodonte chinois RA: ISEIA: C0. Harmonia+: n/a.
Deutsch Chinesische Teichmuschel Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English - Chinese pond mussel Wikipedia - Français - Anodonte chinois Nederlands | Wikispecies: n/a (2020) | CABI
Nederlands n/a Back to the list of invertebrates

Brief description

1k Sinanodonta-woodiana 01Sinanodonta woodiana (Lea, 1834) is a species of freshwater mussel, an aquatic bivalve mollusk in the family Unionidae, the river mussels. The Chinese pond mussel can reach sizes of up to 30 cm and an age of 12–14 years. Yet, they can reproduce in their first year while only 3–4 cm in size. This large freshwater mussel is a habitat generalist with high silt tolerance. It is established worldwide despite having, like all unionid mussels, an obligatory parasitic stage (glochidium), which must encyst on host fish. The species is a broad host generalist, which can complete its development on all fish species tested, both coinvasive and native. The presence of S. woodiana can seriously influence indigenous unionid populations. Sinanodonta woodiana’s great success is attributed to importation and commercialization of Asian carp, its native host. S. woodiana was introduced in Tuscany both inadvertently, and for artificial pearl production. The species is also sold in garden centers as biofiltration for artificial ponds (CABI 2019).

Status and distribution in Luxembourg

Sinanodonta woodiana (Lea, 1834) has not yet been observed in Luxembourg (MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF 2020).

Risk assessment

ISEIA protocol

C0 (2+1+2+1) (Ries et al. 2017: 68).

Harmonia+ protocol

Not assessed yet.

Worldwide distribution

Bibliography

  • CABI, 2019. Sinanodonta woodiana (Lea, 1834). In: Invasive Species Compendium. Wallingford, UK: CAB International. URL: www.cabi.org/isc [accessed 2020-04-21]
  • MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2020. Sinanodonta woodiana (Lea, 1834) in MNHNL-mdata, online portal combining species observation from Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist and GBIF. National Museum of Natural History, Luxembourg. URL: https://mdata.mnhn.lu [Accessed 2020-04-21]
  • Ries, C., A. Arendt, C. Braunert, S. Christian, A. Dohet, A. Frantz, G. Geimer, M. Hellers, J. A. Massard, X. Mestdagh, R. Proess, N. Schneider & M. Pfeiffenschneider, 2017. Environmental impact assessment and black, watch and alert list classification after the ISEIA Protocol of invertebrates in Luxembourg. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 119: 63-70. [PDF 360 KB]

 Page content last updated on 2020-04-21.

Dreissena polymorpha (Pallas, 1771)

English Zebra mussel  Status LU: established. 1st record: <1892.
Lëtzebuergesch Zebramuschel Status Eur.: established.
Français Moule zébrée RA: ISEIA: A2, Black List. Harmonia+: n/a.
Deutsch Zebramuschel Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English - Zebra mussel Wikipedia - Français - Moule zébrée Wikipedia - Deutsch - Zebramuschel Nederlands | Wikispecies: n/a | CABI
Nederlands Driehoeksmossel Back to the list of invertebrates

Brief description

Dreissena polymorpha (I1957) 0265 (39449820624)To date, D. polymorpha has been the most aggressive freshwater invader worldwide. Dreissenids are the only freshwater bivalves that attach to hard substrates in high densities and have a planktonic larval stage. This life history facilitates their abilities as invaders, and allows them to become enormously abundant when introduced into a new water body. Once introduced their populations can grow rapidly, and the total biomass of a population can exceed 10 times that of all other native benthic invertebrates. D. polymorpha is native to the drainage basins of the Black, Caspian and Aral Seas. During the nineteenth century its range has expanded westward to most of western Europe, the UK, and North America, where it is found in the Great Lakes and all major river drainages east of the Rocky Mountains and causes multiple economic impacts on fisheries, aquaculture, water attractions and aquatic transport (CABI 2019).

Status and distribution in Luxembourg

Records of Dreissena polymorpha (Pallas, 1771) in Luxembourg. Data source: Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2021-09-22.

In Luxembourg, Dreissena polymorpha (Pallas, 1771) was first mentioned by Victor Ferrant in 1892 as occurring in the Moselle river (Ferrant 1892; Dhur & Massard 1995; MNHNL 2000-).

Currently, 18 records of the zebra mussel are accessible through the MNHNL-mdata portal (MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF 2019).

Risk assessment

ISEIA protocol

A2 (3+3+3+3) = Black List (Ries et al. 2017: 68).

Harmonia+ protocol

Not assessed yet.

Worldwide distribution

Bibliography

  • CABI, 2019. Dreissena polymorpha (Pallas, 1771). In: Invasive Species Compendium. Wallingford, UK: CAB International. URL: www.cabi.org/isc [accessed 2020-04-21]
  • Dhur, G. & J.A. Massard, 1995. Étude historique et faunistique des Invertébrés immigrés ou introduits dans la Moselle luxembourgeoise et ses affluents. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 96: 127-156. [PDF 1896 KB]
  • Ferrant, V., 1892. Beiträge zur Molluskenfauna des Grossherzogtums Luxemburg (Schluss). Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 2: 21-26. [PDF 419 KB]
  • MNHNL, 2000-. Dreissena polymorpha (Pallas, 1771) in Recorder-Lux, database on the natural heritage of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. Musée national d’histoire naturelle, Luxembourg. URL: https://mdata.mnhn.lu [Accessed 2019-10-24]
  • MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2019. Dreissena polymorpha (Pallas, 1771) in MNHNL-mdata, online portal combining species observation from Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist and GBIF. National Museum of Natural History, Luxembourg. URL: https://mdata.mnhn.lu [Accessed 2019-10-24]
  • Ries, C., A. Arendt, C. Braunert, S. Christian, A. Dohet, A. Frantz, G. Geimer, M. Hellers, J. A. Massard, X. Mestdagh, R. Proess, N. Schneider & M. Pfeiffenschneider, 2017. Environmental impact assessment and black, watch and alert list classification after the ISEIA Protocol of invertebrates in Luxembourg. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 119: 63-70. [PDF 360 KB]

 Page content last updated on 2020-04-21.

Eriocheir sinensis H. Milne-Edwards, 1853

English Chinese mitten crab Status LU: casual. 1st record: 1978.
Lëtzebuergesch Chinesesch Wollhandkrabb Status Eur.: established. IAS of EU concern (2016).
Français Crabe chinois RA: ISEIA: C0. Harmonia+: n/a.
Deutsch Chinesische Wollhandkrabbe Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English - Chinese mitten crab Wikipedia - Français - Crabe chinois Wikipedia - Deutsch - Chinesische Wollhandkrabbe Nederlands | Wikispecies: Wikispecies - Eriocheir sinensis | IUCNGISD | CABI
Nederlands Chinese wolhandkrab Back to the list of invertebrates

Brief description

EriocheirSinensis4

Male specimen of Eriocheir sinensis. Photo by Christian Fischer, 2007-10-06, North-western Brandenburg, Germany. commons.wikimedia.org

Eriocheir sinensis H. Milne-Edwards, 1853 is a migrating crab which has invaded Europe and North America from its native region of Asia. During its mass migrations it contributes to the temporary local extinction of native invertebrates. It modifies habitats by causing erosion due to its intensive burrowing activity and costs fisheries and aquaculture several hundreds of thousands of dollars per year by consuming bait and trapped fish, as well as by damaging gear (GISD 2019).

IAS of Union concern

In 2016, Eriocheir sinensis H. Milne-Edwards, 1853 was added to the list of invasive alien species of Union concern (Anonymous 2016) which implies that member states shall take all necessary steps to prevent it’s unintentional introduction or spread.

Status and distribution in Luxembourg

Records of Eriocheir sinensis H. Milne-Edwards, 1853 in Luxembourg. Data source: Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2021-09-22.

There is no distribution map available because no data has been entered into the Recorder-Lux database so far (MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF 2019).

Eriocheir sinensis H. Milne-Edwards, 1853 was first documented in Luxembourg in 1978 by Claude Meisch who found one individual in a pond of the Haff Réimech nature conservation reserve, municipality of Schengen (Meisch 1978): “It can be regarded as relatively common in the Moselle valley. A single specimen was found in the pond area. It must be regarded as an aberration, since the ponds do not correspond to its normal location”.

Field research by Dhur and Massard in the years 1992-1993 did not find Eriocheir sinensis in the ecosystem of the border Moselle (Dhur & Massard 1995): “It seems likely that currently the species, even if its presence seems confirmed for the period before 1960, no longer populates the waters of the Luxembourg Moselle. A call to fishermen in 1994 (Massard 1994) 1 for them to report a possible presence of Eriocheir did not produce any results. In fact, after its expansion phase, Eriocheir has become considerably scarcer over the past forty years in most of the colonised areas of northern France and the Benelux (Vigneux et al. 1993). No E. sinensis stations are indicated in Lorraine by Vigneux et al. (1993), neither for the period before 1960 nor for the one after.”

On 4 March 2020, two adult crabs of the species Eriocheir sinensis (1 male and 1 female) were found by an inhabitant of the ‘Petite rue du Moulin’ in Esch-sur-Alzette.The crabs were brought to the National Museum of Natural History.

Two adult Eriocheir sinensis (1 male and 1 female) found in Esch-sur-Alzette. Photo: 4 March 2020, Déierenasyl Gaasperech.

Risk assessment

ISEIA protocol

C0 (2+1+2+2) (Ries et al. 2017: 68).

Harmonia+ protocol

Not assessed yet.

Worldwide distribution

CABI 2014: https://www.cabi.org/isc/datasheet/84120#toDistributionMaps

Bibliography

  • Anonymous, 2016. Commission implementing regulation (EU) 2016/1141 of 13 July 2016 adopting a list of invasive alien species of Union concern pursuant to Regulation (EU) No 1143/2014 of the European Parliament and of the Council. Official Journal of the European Union L 189: 4-5.
  • CABI, 2014. Eriocheir sinensis H. Milne-Edwards, 1853 [original text by Stephan Gollasch & Paul Clark]. In: Invasive Species Compendium. Wallingford, UK: CAB International. URL: www.cabi.org/isc [accessed 2019-11-25]
  • Dhur, G. et J. A. Massard, 1995. Étude historique et faunistique des Invertébrés immigrés ou introduits dans la Moselle luxembourgeoise et ses affluents. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 96: 127-156. [PDF]
  • GISD, 2019. Species profile: Eriocheir sinensis in the Global Invasive Species Database. URL: http://www.iucngisd.org/gisd/species.php?sc=38 [accessed 2019-11-26]
  • Massard, J. A., 1994. Gesucht: die Chinesische Wollhandkrabbe. Lëtzebuerger Journal 1994, Nr. 94 (19. Mai): 10.
  • Meisch, C., 1978. Nachweis der Wollhandkrabbe (Eriocheir sinensis). P. 40 in: Baggerweieren Remerschen/Wentreng: Erhuelung an Naturschutz oder Ausverkaf vun enger Landschaft? Jeunes et environnement, Luxembourg. [PDF]
  • Meisch, C. & J.A. Massard, 2015. Les recherches sur les crustacés (Crustacea) du Luxembourg : aperçu historique. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 116: 381-390. [PDF 1,22 MB]
  • MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2019. MNHNL-mdata, online portal combining species observation from Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist and GBIF. National Museum of Natural History, Luxembourg. URL: https://mdata.mnhn.lu [Accessed 2019-10-25]
  • Ries, C., A. Arendt, C. Braunert, S. Christian, A. Dohet, A. Frantz, G. Geimer, M. Hellers, J. A. Massard, X. Mestdagh, R. Proess, N. Schneider & M. Pfeiffenschneider, 2017. Environmental impact assessment and black, watch and alert list classification after the ISEIA Protocol of invertebrates in Luxembourg. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 119: 63-70. [PDF 360 KB]
  • Vigneux, E., P. Keith & P. Noël, 1993. Atlas préliminaire des Crustacés Décapodes d’eau douce de France. Coll. Patrimoines Naturels 14, S.F.F., 8.1.M.M.-M.N.H.N., Min. Env., Paris, 55 p.

 Page content last updated on 2020-03-12. Last proofread by Caroline Grounds on 2019-12-10.

Stictocephala bisonia Kopp & Yonke, 1977

English Buffalo treehopper Status LU: established. 1st record: 2002.
Lëtzebuergesch Büffel-Zikad Status Eur.: established.
Français Cicadelle bison RA: ISEIA: C2. Harmonia+: n/a.
Deutsch Büffelzikade Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English - Buffalo treehopper Wikipedia - Français - Cicadelle bison Wikipedia - Deutsch - Büffelzikade Nederlands | Wikispecies: n/a (2020)
Nederlands Buffelcicade Back to the list of invertebrates

Brief description

BueffelzikadeStictocephala bisonia Kopp & Yonke, 1977 is a species of treehopper belonging to the subfamily Membracinae. It is also sometimes classified as Ceresa bisonia. This species is native to North America, but now it is widespread throughout southern Europe and it is also present in the Near East and in North Africa. Both adult and immature buffalo treehoppers feed upon sap using specialized mouthparts suited for this purpose. Black locust, clover, elm, goldenrod, and willow are among their favorite food sources. It is also an occasional pest of fruit trees and is harmful to young orchard trees, especially apple trees. It has become an invasive species in some parts of Europe (Wikipedia contributors 2020).

Status and distribution in Luxembourg

Records of Stictocephala bisonia Kopp & Yonke, 1977 in Luxembourg. Data source: Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2021-09-22.

Stictocephala bisonia Kopp & Yonke, 1977 was first documented by Robert Biedermann on 15th September 2002 near Remerschen, municipality of Schengen (MNHNL 2000-).

Currently, 61 records of the buffalo treehopper in Luxembourg are accessible through the MNHNL-mdata portal, all of them in the Gutland, the southern half of the country (MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF 2021).

Risk assessment

ISEIA protocol

C2 (2+1+1+1) (Ries et al. 2017: 69).

Harmonia+ protocol

Not assessed yet.

Worldwide distribution

Bibliography

  • GBIF, 2019. Stictocephala bisonia Kopp & Yonke, 1977 in GBIF Secretariat (2019). GBIF Backbone Taxonomy. Checklist dataset https://doi.org/10.15468/39omei [accessed 2020-04-21]
  • MNHNL, 2000-. Stictocephala bisonia Kopp & Yonke, 1977 in Recorder-Lux, database on the natural heritage of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. Musée national d’histoire naturelle, Luxembourg. URL: https://mdata.mnhn.lu [Accessed 2020-04-21]
  • MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2021. Stictocephala bisonia Kopp & Yonke, 1977 in MNHNL-mdata, online portal combining species observation from Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist and GBIF. National Museum of Natural History, Luxembourg. URL: https://mdata.mnhn.lu [Accessed 2021-04-14]
  • Ries, C., A. Arendt, C. Braunert, S. Christian, A. Dohet, A. Frantz, G. Geimer, M. Hellers, J. A. Massard, X. Mestdagh, R. Proess, N. Schneider & M. Pfeiffenschneider, 2017. Environmental impact assessment and black, watch and alert list classification after the ISEIA Protocol of invertebrates in Luxembourg. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 119: 63-70. [PDF 360 KB]
  • Wikipedia contributors, 2020. ‘Buffalo treehopper’, Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 3 January 2020, 06:54 UTC, <https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Buffalo_treehopper&oldid=933829844> [accessed 2020-04-21]

 Page content last updated on 2021-04-14.

Stephanitis takeyai Drake & Maa, 1955

English Andromeda lace bug Status LU: casual. 1st record: 2019.
Lëtzebuergesch Andromeda-Netzwanz Status Eur.: established.
Français n/a RA: ISEIA: C1. Harmonia+: n/a.
Deutsch Andromeda-Netzwanze Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English - Andromeda lace bug Wikipedia - Deutsch - Andromeda-Netzwanze Nederlands | Wikispecies: n/a (2020)
Nederlands Rotsheidenetwants Back to the list of invertebrates

Brief description

Stephanitis takeyai (Tingidae sp.), Mook, the Netherlands - 2Stephanitis takeyai Drake & Maa, 1955 is a pest insect on plants of the genus Pieris, especially Pieris japonica, the Japanese andromeda. It originated in Japan with its host plant but has since been introduced to other areas of the globe. The andromeda lace bug is about 3 millimeters in length. It has a characteristic rounded pronotum, lacy black and white wings, and shiny gold highlighting. The bug produces mottling on the leaves of the plant, and heavy infestations can cause the leaves to drop in large numbers, stunting the plant’s growth. Both nymph and adult forms damage the leaves by piercing them to suck the juices, and leave dark frass on the undersides of the leaves. Damage is worst on plants that grow in full sun (Wikipedia contributors 2018).

“Stephanitis takeyai is an invasive Tingidae native to Japan. It was introduced to Europe in 1994 through the plant trade in the Netherlands with its feeder plant Pieris japonica (Aukema 1996). It reached Germany in 2002 (Baufeld 2002), Belgium in 2003 (Aukema et al. 2005) and France in 2004 (Streito 2006)” (Schneider 2020).

Status and distribution in Luxembourg

Stephanitis takeyai Drake & Maa, 1955 was first found on 24th June 2019 in the kitchen of a private house in Roeser. The often open door of this kitchen communicates with a garden in which grows Pieris japonica (the Japanese andromeda), the host plant of the Andromeda lace bug (Schneider 2020: 100).

There is no distribution map available because no data has been entered into the Recorder-Lux database so far (MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF 2020). The Andromeda lace bug is present in our three neighbouring countries (Rabitsch 2010).

Risk assessment

ISEIA protocol

Following its discovery in Luxembourg in 2019, the species has been reassessed on 14th September 2020 to C1 (3+1+1+1) by Christian Ries. Assessment before the appearance of the species in Luxembourg: C0 (3+1+1+1) (Ries et al. 2017: 69).

Harmonia+ protocol

Not assessed yet.

Worldwide distribution

Bibliography

  • Aukema, B., 1996. Stephanitis takeyai on Pieris japonica. Mededelingen van de Plantenziektenkundige Dienst 179: 46–47
  • Aukema, B., J. M. Bruers & G. Viskens, 2005. Nieuwe en zeldzame Belgische wantsen (Hemiptera: Heteroptera). Bulletin van de Koninklijke Belgische Vereniging voor Entomologie 141: 33–37.
  • Baufeld, P., 2002. Die Andromedanetzwanze (Stephanitis takeyai) – ein neuer Schädling an Ziergehölzen. Nachrichtenblatt des Deutschen Pflanzenschutzdienstes 54: 318–319.
  • GBIF, 2019. Stephanitis takeyai Drake & Maa, 1955 in GBIF Secretariat (2019). GBIF Backbone Taxonomy. Checklist dataset https://doi.org/10.15468/39omei [accessed 2020-04-20]
  • MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2020. Stephanitis takeyai Drake & Maa, 1955 in MNHNL-mdata, online portal combining species observation from Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist and GBIF. National Museum of Natural History, Luxembourg. URL: https://mdata.mnhn.lu [Accessed 2020-04-20]
  • Rabitsch, W., 2010. True Bugs (Hemiptera, Heteroptera). Biorisk 4: 407-433. Pensoft. Sofia-Moscow. Doi: 10.3897/biorisk.4.44
  • Ries, C., A. Arendt, C. Braunert, S. Christian, A. Dohet, A. Frantz, G. Geimer, M. Hellers, J. A. Massard, X. Mestdagh, R. Proess, N. Schneider & M. Pfeiffenschneider, 2017. Environmental impact assessment and black, watch and alert list classification after the ISEIA Protocol of invertebrates in Luxembourg. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 119: 63-70. [PDF 360 KB]
  • Schneider, N., 2020. Premières mentions d’Oxycarenus lavaterae (Fabricius, 1787), de Tropidothorax leucopterus (Goeze, 1778) et de Stephanitis takeyai Drake & Maa, 1955 (Insecta, Hemiptera, Heteroptera) au Luxembourg. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 122 : 99-102. [PDF]
  • Streito, J.C., 2006. Note sur quelques espèces envahissantes de Tingidae : Corythucha ciliata (Say, 1932), Stephanitis pyrioides (Scott, 1874) et Stephanitis takeyai Drake & Maa, 1955 (Hemiptera Tingidae). L’Entomologiste 62 : 31-36.
  • Wikipedia contributors, 2018. Stephanitis takeyai, Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 21 March 2018, 10:34 UTC, <https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Stephanitis_takeyai&oldid=831595662> [accessed20 April 2020]

 Page content last updated on 2020-09-14.

Stephanitis rhododendri Horvath

English Rhododendron lace bug Status LU: absent.
Lëtzebuergesch Rhododendron-Netzwanz Status Eur.: established.
Français Tigre du rhododendron RA: ISEIA: C0. Harmonia+: n/a.
Deutsch Rhododendron-Netzwanze Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English - Varroa mite | Wikispecies: Wikispecies - Varroa destructor
Nederlands Back to the list of invertebrates

Brief description

Source: CC by The Trustees of the Natural History Museum, London

Stephanitis rhododendri Horvath is a species of lace bug in the family Tingidae. It is found in Africa, Australia, Europe & Northern Asia (excluding China), and North America  (Wikipedia contributors, 2019).

Status and distribution in Luxembourg

Stephanitis rhododendri Horvath has not yet been reported from Luxembourg (MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF 2020).

Risk assessment

ISEIA protocol

C0 (3+1+1+1) (Ries et al. 2017: 69).

Harmonia+ protocol

Not assessed yet.

Worldwide distribution

Bibliography

  • GBIF, 2020. Stephanitis rhododendri Horvath in GBIF Secretariat (2019). GBIF Backbone Taxonomy. Checklist dataset https://doi.org/10.15468/39omei [accessed 2020-04-20]
  • MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2020. Stephanitis rhododendri Horvath in MNHNL-mdata, online portal combining species observation from Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist and GBIF. National Museum of Natural History, Luxembourg. URL: https://mdata.mnhn.lu [Accessed 2020-04-20]
  • Ries, C., A. Arendt, C. Braunert, S. Christian, A. Dohet, A. Frantz, G. Geimer, M. Hellers, J. A. Massard, X. Mestdagh, R. Proess, N. Schneider & M. Pfeiffenschneider, 2017. Environmental impact assessment and black, watch and alert list classification after the ISEIA Protocol of invertebrates in Luxembourg. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 119: 63-70. [PDF 360 KB]
  • Wikipedia contributors, 2019. Stephanitis rhododendri, in: Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 23 September 2019, 04:36 UTC, <https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Stephanitis_rhododendri&oldid=917291154> [accessed 2020-04-20]

 Page content last updated on 2020-04-20.

Sceliphron curvatum (F. Smith, 1870)

English Curved wasp Status LU: uncertain. 1st record: 2011.
Lëtzebuergesch Orientalesch Mauerharespel Status Eur.: established.
Français Pélopée courbée RA: ISEIA: C1. Harmonia+: n/a.
Deutsch Orientalische Mauerwespe Wikipedia: Wikipedia - Français - Pélopée courbée Nederlands | Wikispecies: n/a (2017)
Nederlands Oosterse langsteelgraafwesp Back to the list of invertebrates

Brief description

Sceliphron fg01Sceliphron curvatum (F. Smith, 1870) is a species of hymenopteran insects, and more precisely a mason wasp, of the family Sphecidae. It is a species native to the mountainous regions of Asia, particularly the Himalayas, and has recently appeared in Europe (early 1980s). It is locally invasive, including in France in the South-East, where it could perhaps compete with native species (Wikipedia contributors 2019).

Status and distribution in Luxembourg

Records of Sceliphron curvatum (F. Smith, 1870) in Luxembourg. Data source: Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2021-09-22.

Sceliphron curvatum (F. Smith, 1870) was observed for the first time in Luxembourg on 15th July 2011 near Echternach (Schneider et al. 2014).

No further observations are documented so far (MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2020).

Risk assessment

ISEIA protocol

C1 (3+1+1+1) (Ries et al. 2017: 69).

Harmonia+ protocol

Not assessed yet.

Worldwide distribution

Bibliography

  • CABI, 2019. Sceliphron curvatum (F. Smith, 1870). In: Invasive Species Compendium. Wallingford, UK: CAB International. URL: www.cabi.org/isc [accessed 2020-04-10]
  • MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2020. Sceliphron curvatum (F. Smith, 1870) in MNHNL-mdata, online portal combining species observation from Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist and GBIF. National Museum of Natural History, Luxembourg. URL: https://mdata.mnhn.lu [accessed 2020-04-10]
  • Ries, C., A. Arendt, C. Braunert, S. Christian, A. Dohet, A. Frantz, G. Geimer, M. Hellers, J. A. Massard, X. Mestdagh, R. Proess, N. Schneider & M. Pfeiffenschneider, 2017. Environmental impact assessment and black, watch and alert list classification after the ISEIA Protocol of invertebrates in Luxembourg. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 119: 63-70. [PDF 360 KB]
  • Schneider, N., Y. Barbier, A. Pauly & S. Christian, 2014. Découverte de Sceliphron curvatum (Smith, 1870) en Belgique et au Luxembourg (Insecta, Hymenoptera, Sphecidae). Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 115: 251-253. [PDF 842 KB]
  • Wikipedia contributors, 2019. ‘Pélopée courbée’, Wikipédia, l’encyclopédie libre, 25 avril 2019, 05:55 UTC, <https://fr.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=P%C3%A9lop%C3%A9e_courb%C3%A9e&oldid=158729271> [accessed 2020-04-10]

 Page content last updated on 2020-04-10. Last proofread by Caroline Grounds on 2019-12-11.