First occurence of Aedes japonicus in Luxembourg

3 female imago of Aedes japonicus (Theobald, 1901) have been captured on 4th July 2018 in Stolzembourg in the valley of the Our (Oesling). Field prospection on 1st and 2nd August showed the East Asian bush mosquito is also present in Bivels, Vianden, Wahlhausen and Gemünd (D). Further investigations will be undertaken in August to assess the geographical distribution of the species in Luxembourg.

Aedes japonicus is a mosquito species originally native to Japan, Korea and southern China, and is important for humans as a potential vector of pathogens such as the West Nile virus and of various types of encephalitis viruses.

The species is already established in the Province of Namur (Belgium), in North Rhine-Westphalia, Rhineland-Palatinate (Kreis Ahrweiler) and Hesse (Germany), and in Bas-Rhin, Haut-Rhin, Vosges (France).

Advice for the population

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Useful links

 Last updated on Thu, Aug 9, 2018.

Aedes japonicus (Theobald, 1901)

English East Asian bush or rock pool mosquito ISEIA: C2
Lëtzebuergesch Japanesch Hecke-Moustique EASIN
Français n/a Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English - East Asian bush mosquito Wikipedia - Français Wikipedia - Deutsch - Asiatische Buschmücke Wikipedia - Nederlands
Deutsch Asiatische Buschmücke Wikispecies: n/a
Nederlands Aziatische bosmug Back to the list of invertebrates

Advice for the population

Web pages

Flyers

Importance and distribution in Luxembourg

Distribution map of Aedes japonicus (Theobald, 1901) in Luxembourg. Recorder database, MNHNL, 12.12.2018.

3 female imago of Aedes japonicus (Syn.: Hulecoeteomyia japonica) have been captured on 4th July 2018 in Stolzembourg, Oesling. Field prospection on 1st and 2nd August showed the East Asian bush mosquito is also present in Bivels, Vianden, Wahlhausen and Gemünd (D). Further field studies in August and October 2018 revealed the presence of a large population of Aedes japonicus, detected in 16 sites distributed over 12 localities, 12 municipalities, 7 cantons and 3 districts. The colonised area can be estimated to date to cover at least 550 km2, located in the east of the Grand Duchy, from the valley of the Our in the north to Ernster in the south, and as far as Kautenbach and Ettelbruck in the west. The mosquito was not detected in neighbouring Belgium (Clairefontaine and Ouren) but in Germany, where it has been present for several years in Rhineland-Palatinate and from where it has certainly migrated to the Grand Duchy. We also detected it in the French border town of Contz-les-Bains, which suggests that the mosquito is probably present, although not detected to date, in the region bordering the Moselle, from Manternach to the French border (Schaffner 2018).

Distribution of the mosquito Aedes japonicus known as of 10 October 2018, for Luxembourg and the neighbouring regions of Germany, Belgium and France. Purple: proven presence; Purple with star: data from the German surveillance network; Green: undetected presence. Source: Schaffner 2018.

The species is established in the Province of Namur (Belgium), in North Rhine-Westphalia, Rhineland-Palatinate and Hesse (Germany), and in Bas-Rhin, Haut-Rhin, Vosges (France).

Aedes japonicus is a mosquito species originally native to Japan, Korea and southern China, and is important for humans as a potential vector of pathogens such as the West Nile virus and of various types of encephalitis viruses.

Risk assessment

ISEIA protocol: C2 (3+2+2+1), assessment updated on 13 August 2018 by M. Pfeiffenschneider & C. Ries. Former assessment under it’s synonym Hulecoeteomyia japonica: C0 (2+1+1+1) (Ries et al. 2017: 68).

Initial importations and spread in Europe

Source: https://ecdc.europa.eu/en/disease-vectors/facts/mosquito-factsheets/aedes-japonicus [accessed July 31 2018]

Aedes japonicus was first reported in Europe in 2000 when it was detected in Normandy (Orne) in northern France, where it was later eliminated. It was then reported in 2002 in Belgium at a tyre depot and presence as adults and larvae was confirmed in 2007 and 2008. It was most likely introduced through the trade of tyres and the population was thought to be established at the company site but does not appear to be spreading. It was detected in Switzerland in 2008 following reports of a biting nuisance and subsequent surveys revealed a 1,400 km colonised zone including an area in Germany. This was the first detection of invasive mosquitospreading in central Europe. No obvious route of introduction was identified in this study but it is suspected that the species has been present here for some time. Adult Ae. japonicus were then found in Southern Germany during 2011, following intensified surveillance. This resulted in surveillance expanding to cover the entire federal state of Baden-Württemberg where a reduction in the colonised areas compared to 2010 was reported (possibly due to a dry spring during 2011). However, a large, newly infested area was also reported from the city of Stuttgart to the Swabian Mountains. Entomological surveys carried out during 2012 in North Rhine-Westphalia also revealed the presence of an established population in the west of the country. Aedes japonicus were then reported further north in southern Lower Saxony and northeastern North Rhine-Westphalia during spring 2013. It was detected in 2012 and 2013 in Lelystad, the Netherlands.

Source: European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control: The map shows the current known distribution of Aedes japonicus in Europe at at ‘regional’ administrative level (NUTS3), as of June 2018.

Possible future expansion 

It is suggested that Aedes japonicus may expand beyond its current geographical distribution but there is still a lack of information available on this invasive mosquito species.

References

  • Ministère de la Santé, 2018. Première apparition du moustique japonais « Aedes japonicus » au Luxembourg. Communiqué de presse du 1er août 2018. [PDF 40 KB]
  • Schaffner, F., 2018. Le moustique Aedes japonicus au Luxembourg : État des connaissances au 10 octobre 2018. Rapport de mission pour la Direction de la santé, grand-duché de Luxembourg. 14 p. [PDF 1.4 MB]
  • Ries, C., A. Arendt, C. Braunert, S. Christian, A. Dohet, A. Frantz, G. Geimer, M. Hellers, J. A. Massard, X. Mestdagh, R. Proess, N. Schneider & M. Pfeiffenschneider, 2017. Environmental impact assessment and black, watch and alert list classification after the ISEIA Protocol of invertebrates in Luxembourg. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 119: 63-70. [PDF 360 KB]

 Last updated on Mon, Oct 29, 2018.

EU published Delegated Regulation on IAS risk assessments

The European Commission published today in the Official Journal the Delegated Regulation (EU) 2018/968 of 30 April 2018 supplementing Regulation (EU) No 1143/2014 of the European Parliament and of the Council with regard to risk assessments in relation to invasive alien species.

All language versions are available here: https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=uriserv:OJ.L_.2018.174.01.0005.01.ENG&toc=OJ:L:2018:174:TOC

Comunicated by the IAS team of the Environment Directorate-General of the European Commission.

Note: All documents and information related to the IAS Regulation can be found at http://ec.europa.eu/environment/nature/invasivealien/

 Last updated on Wed, Jul 11, 2018.

Parthenocissus quinquefolia (L.) Planch.

English Five-leaved Virginia creeper ISEIA: B1 – Watch List
Lëtzebuergesch Fënnefbliedrege Wëlle Wäin EASIN
Français Vigne-vierge à cinq folioles Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English - Five-leaved Virginia creeper Wikipedia - Français - Vigne-vierge à cinq folioles Wikipedia - Deutsch - Selbstkletternde Jungfernrebe Wikipedia - Nederlands - Vijfbladige wingerd
Deutsch Selbstkletternde Jungfernrebe Wikispecies: Wikispecies - Parthenocissus quinquefolia
Nederlands Vijfbladige wingerd Back to the list of neophytes

Importance and distribution in Luxembourg

Distribution map of Parthenocissus quinquefolia (L.) Planch. in Luxembourg. Recorder database, MNHNL, 12.12.2018.

The Recorder database shows 7 observations in Luxembourg dating from 1958 to 2016 (18/01/2018).

General note on Parthenocissus spp.

Originally observed in man-made habitats, these popular garden plants can be found increasingly often in natural habitats like coastal dunes, riparian habitats and wood margins (Parthenocissus inserta) or rock outcrops (Parthenocissus quinquefolia). They usually thrive on nutrient-rich soils. Seeds are dispersed over long distances by birds. With its dense growth, the plant may cover, outcompete and kill native vegetation. Source: http://ias.biodiversity.be.

Risk assessment

ISEIA protocol: B1 (3+3+2+2), reassessed on 10 July 2018 by C. Ries and M. Pfeiffenschneider. Originally assessed together with Parthenocissus inserta as Parthenocissus spp. C1 (1+1+1+1) (Ries et al. 2013: 18).

Bibliography concerning Luxembourg

  • Ries, C., Y. Krippel, M. Pfeiffenschneider & S. Schneider, 2013. Environmental impact assessment and black, watch and alert list classification after the ISEIA Protocol of non-native vascular plant species in Luxembourg. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 114: 15-21. [PDF 652 KB]

 Last updated on Wed, Jul 11, 2018.

Parthenocissus inserta (Kerner) Fritsch

English False Virginia creeper ISEIA: B1 – Watch List
Lëtzebuergesch Gewéinleche Wëlle Wäin EASIN
Français Vigne vierge commune Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English - False Virginia creeper Wikipedia - Français - Vigne vierge commune Wikipedia - Deutsch - Wilder Wein Wikipedia - Nederlands - Valse wingerd
Deutsch Gewöhnliche Jungfernrebe Wikispecies: Wikispecies - Parthenocissus inserta
Nederlands Valse wingerd Back to the list of neophytes

Importance and distribution in Luxembourg

Distribution map of Parthenocissus inserta (Kerner) Fritsch in Luxembourg. Recorder database, MNHNL, 12.12.2018.

The Recorder database shows 4 observations in Luxembourg since the 19th century to 2016 (10/07/2018).

General note on Parthenocissus spp.

Originally observed in man-made habitats, these popular garden plants can be found increasingly often in natural habitats like coastal dunes, riparian habitats and wood margins (Parthenocissus inserta) or rock outcrops (Parthenocissus quinquefolia). They usually thrive on nutrient-rich soils. Seeds are dispersed over long distances by birds. With its dense growth, the plant may cover, outcompete and kill native vegetation. Source: http://ias.biodiversity.be.

Risk assessment

ISEIA protocol: B1 (3+3+2+2), reassessed on 10 July 2018 by C. Ries and M. Pfeiffenschneider. Originally assessed together with Parthenocissus quinquefolia as Parthenocissus spp. C1 (1+1+1+1) (Ries et al. 2013: 18).

Bibliography concerning Luxembourg

  • Ries, C., Y. Krippel, M. Pfeiffenschneider & S. Schneider, 2013. Environmental impact assessment and black, watch and alert list classification after the ISEIA Protocol of non-native vascular plant species in Luxembourg. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 114: 15-21. [PDF 652 KB]

 Last updated on Wed, Jul 11, 2018.

Movie on IAS by Chamber-TV

In the frame of the draft law n°7205 implementing the Regulation (EU) No 1143/2014 on IAS 1, the Luxembourg Parliament TV (Chamber-TV) explains the context in a movie published on facebook.

Link to the video in case your browser doesn’t show the movie on this page.

 Last updated on Thu, May 17, 2018.

Website neobiota.lu relaunched

At the beginning of April 2018 the website neobiota.lu was relaunched. In addition to a new WordPress theme that is still compatible with all possible screen sizes, the 136 Internet pages on which individual invasive species are presented have been updated. On each species page a reporting link is provided which opens the corresponding reporting page on the data portal of the National Museum of Natural History. As soon as a listed invasive alien species is reported, an alert email is automatically sent to members of IAS Group Luxembourg, who dispatch the information to experts in charge of data validation. This procedure constitutes a crucial tool in early detection of IAS.

A number of new Internet pages have been added, including the list of IAS of EU concern and the Black, Watch, Alert Lists and a full listing of IAS relevant to Luxembourg.

If you, dear readers, notice any inconsistencies or typing errors, please do not hesitate to → .

Christian Ries & Manou Pfeiffenschneider

 Last updated on Mon, Jun 11, 2018.

Public conference on IAS – 20 March 2018 @ MNHNL

Presentation slides in PDF format

Invasive alien species of Luxembourg and EU concern

European regulation and challenges for Luxembourg

In order to combat invasive alien species with a significant impact on biodiversity, public health or the economy, a European regulation (No. 1143/2014) defines a whole range of measures and obligations. Member States must therefore, among other things, set up a monitoring system, provide for management measures or even eradication, and impose restrictions on the keeping and marketing of these species.

The conference aims to give an overview of the obligations arising from these regulations and to present the targeted species with a particular focus on those already present in Luxembourg. Finally, the widely used species action plans currently under development will be presented.

Within the framework of setting up a surveillance system in Luxembourg, the contribution of field actors is a key element. The conference is also intended to motivate naturalists and other interested parties to share their observations.

Detailed program

  1. The European Regulation on the prevention and management of the introduction and spread of invasive alien species – Nora Elvinger (MDDI)
  2. Species covered by European regulations – Sandra Cellina (ANF), Carole Molitor (AGE), Christian Ries (MNHNL)
  3. Action Plans for the Management of Widely Spread Alien Species – Tiago de Sousa (ANF)

Organisation: Ministry of Sustainable Development and Infrastructure – Environment Department (MDDI), Nature and Forestry Administration (ANF), Water Management Administration (AGE), National Museum of Natural History (MNHNL), The Luxembourg Naturalist Society (SNL), Association of Luxembourg Biologists (ABIOL).

Registration

Registration requested by email at

Invitation [French, PDF 294 KB]

 Last updated on Thu, Mar 22, 2018.