Cheiracanthium punctorium (Villers, 1789)

English Yellow sac spider 1 Status LU: established. 1st record: 1988.
Lëtzebuergesch Getëppelten Darfanger Status Eur.: established.
Français n/a RA: ISEIA: C2. Harmonia+: n/a.
Deutsch Ammendornfinger Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English - Yellow sac spider Wikipedia - Français - Chiroconthe ponctu Wikipedia - Deutsch - Ammen-Dornfinger Wikipedia - Nederlands - Grote bermzakspin | Wikispecies: Wikispecies - Cheiracanthium punctorium | wiki.arages.de
Nederlands Grote bermzakspin Back to the list of invertebrates

Brief description

Female Cheiracanthium punctorium in opened cocoon. Clutch of eggs in the Back of the cocoon.Cheiracanthium punctorium (Villers, 1789) lives in grasslands, preferring tall stalks. Being rather similar to several native Cheiracanthium species in its biology, C. punctorium should have no greater influence on the composition of native prey species in a colonised biotope. There may, however, be some competition with similar predators.

The species is known as quite aggressive when disturbed, especially pregnant or egg-protecting females. The chelicerae (fangs) of bigger individuals can easily penetrate through human skin and inject their venom. A bite of C. punctorium is painful and causes itching and swellings, and sometimes stronger reactions like vertigo, nausea, shivering, circulatory collapse and light fever. The symptoms usually decline after 24-30 hours. As the species leads a rather hidden lifestyle, the probability for bites should be rather small. There is a certain, but unfortunately sometimes overstated, media exposure of the species and its venomousness.

Status and distribution in Luxembourg

Records of Cheiracanthium punctorium (Villers, 1789) in Luxembourg. Data source: Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2022-05-24.

Cheiracanthium punctorium (Villers, 1789) was first documented in 1988 at the Aarnescht nature conservation reserve near Oberanven, municipality of Niederanven (Hermann 1998).

The species is rather thermophilous and therefore geographically restricted to the south of Luxembourg. Most observations have been made in dry grassland in the Moselle valley. Climate warming may favour further spread of the species.

Currently, 12 records of the species are accessible through the MNHNL-mdata portal; at the previously mentioned Aarnescht, and also at Roudebierg and Haard near Dudelange (MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF 2021).

Risk assessment

ISEIA protocol

C2 (2+2+2+1) (Ries et al. 2017: 68).

Harmonia+ protocol

Not assessed yet.

Distribution in Europe

Source: Arachnologische Gesellschaft (2020).

Bibliography

  • Arachnologische Gesellschaft, 2020. Atlas of the European Arachnids, accessed at https://atlas.arages.de [accessed 2020-03-05]
  • Hermann, E., 1998. Die Spinnen (Araneae) ausgewählter Halbtrockenrasen im Osten Luxemburgs. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 99: 189-199. [PDF 165KB]
  • MNHNL, 2000-. Cheiracanthium punctorium (Villers, 1789) in Recorder-Lux, database on the natural heritage of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. Musée national d’histoire naturelle, Luxembourg. URL: https://mdata.mnhn.lu [Accessed 2019-10-24]
  • MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2021. Cheiracanthium punctorium (Villers, 1789) in MNHNL-mdata, online portal combining species observation from Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist and GBIF. National Museum of Natural History, Luxembourg. URL: https://mdata.mnhn.lu [Accessed 2019-10-24]
  • Ries, C., A. Arendt, C. Braunert, S. Christian, A. Dohet, A. Frantz, G. Geimer, M. Hellers, J. A. Massard, X. Mestdagh, R. Proess, N. Schneider & M. Pfeiffenschneider, 2017. Environmental impact assessment and black, watch and alert list classification after the ISEIA Protocol of invertebrates in Luxembourg. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 119: 63-70. [PDF 360 KB]
  • Schneider, N., 2003. Auf Spurensuche. 22. Op der Aarnescht. Regulus 12/03: 22
  • Thiel, M., 2016. Ein unheimlicher Zuwanderer. Eine südeuropäische Giftspinne zieht zunehmend nach Norden. Luxemburger Wort, 14.9.2016.

 Page content last updated on 2021-04-14. Last proofread by Caroline Grounds on 2019-12-05.

Argiope bruennichi (Scopoli, 1772)

English Wasp spider Status LU: established. 1st record: 1906.
Lëtzebuergesch Harespelspann Status Eur.: established.
Français Argiope frelon RA: ISEIA: C3. Harmonia+: n/a
Deutsch Wespenspinne Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English - Wasp spider Wikipedia - Français - Argiope frelon Wikipedia - Deutsch - Wespenspinne Nederlands | Wikispecies: Wikispecies | CABI
Nederlands Wespspin Back to the list of invertebrates

Brief description

Argiope_bruennichi_Belgrad_060714

Argiope bruennichi in a pasture near Frisange (14.07.2006)

Like many other members of its genus, Argiope bruennichi (Scopoli, 1772) shows striking yellow and black markings on its abdomen. The spider builds a spiral orb web at dawn or dusk, commonly in long grass a little above ground level (Wikipedia contributors 2019a).

Until around 50 years ago, the wasp spider was widespread in southern Europe, and very rarely present in central Europe. Since then the species has greatly enlarged and extended its area. Now it can be found in almost all European countries, as well as in some Asian and North African countries (Wikipedia contributors 2019b). The rapid spread of the species across Europe is generally thought to be facilitated by climate warming.

On sites where this strikingly marked spider occurs, the individual number can be very high. Argiope bruennichi populations might be a certain threat for rare species of their favourite prey and provoke changes in invertebrate communities of conquered sites. However the spider seems to integrate rather well in invaded countries, causing no great damage.

Status and distribution in Luxembourg

Records of Argiope bruennichi (Scopoli, 1772) in Luxembourg. Data source: Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2022-05-24.

Argiope bruennichi (Scopoli, 1772) was first documented by Dr Ernest Feltgen on 24 August 1906 in Lintgen (Weinachter 1906; MNHNL 2000-).

Currently, 188 records of the wasp spider are accessible through the MNHNL-mdata portal (MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF 2019).

The species can be considered as widespread in the Grand Duchy.

Risk assessment

ISEIA protocol

C3 (2+2+2+2) (Ries et al. 2017: 68).

Harmonia+ protocol

Not assessed yet.

Worldwide distribution

Bibliography

  • CABI, 2019. Argiope bruennichi. In: Invasive Species Compendium. Wallingford, UK: CAB International. URL: www.cabi.org/isc [accessed 2020-03-04]
  • MNHNL, 2000-. Argiope bruennichi (Scopoli, 1772) in Recorder-Lux, database on the natural heritage of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. Musée national d’histoire naturelle, Luxembourg. URL: https://mdata.mnhn.lu [Accessed 2019-10-16]
  • MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2019. Argiope bruennichi (Scopoli, 1772) in MNHNL-mdata, online portal combining species observation from Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist and GBIF. National Museum of Natural History, Luxembourg. URL: https://mdata.mnhn.lu [Accessed 2019-10-16]
  • Ries, C., A. Arendt, C. Braunert, S. Christian, A. Dohet, A. Frantz, G. Geimer, M. Hellers, J. A. Massard, X. Mestdagh, R. Proess, N. Schneider & M. Pfeiffenschneider, 2017. Environmental impact assessment and black, watch and alert list classification after the ISEIA Protocol of invertebrates in Luxembourg. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 119: 63-70. [PDF 360 KB]
  • Weinachter, P., 1906. Comptes Rendus des Séances Fauna 16, 10: 215. [eluxembourgensia]
  • Weiss, J., 1992. Die Ecke des Naturbeobachters. Regulus 3/92: 96-97.
  • Wikipedia contributors, 2019a. Argiope bruennichi (Scopoli, 1772) in Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. URL: https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Argiope_bruennichi&oldid=921986406 [accessed 24 October 2019]
  • Wikipedia contributors, 2019b. Argiope bruennichi (Scopoli, 1772) in Wikipedia, Die freie Enzyklopädie. URL: https://de.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Wespenspinne&oldid=192274595 [accessed 24 October 2019]

 Page content last updated on 2020-04-28. Last proofread by Caroline Grounds on 2019-12-04.

Procambarus clarkii (Girard, 1852)

English Red swamp crayfish Status LU: absent.
Lëtzebuergesch Roude Suppekriibs Status Eur.: established. IAS of EU concern (2016).
Français Écrevisse de Louisiane RA: ISEIA: A0, Alert List.
Deutsch Roter Amerikanischer Sumpfkrebs Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English - Signal crayfish Wikipedia - Français - Ecrevisse de Californie Wikipedia - Deutsch - Signalkrebs Nederlands | Wikispecies: Wikispecies | CABI
Nederlands Rode rivierkreeft Back to the list of invertebrates

Brief description

Procambarus clarkii (Girard, 1852) is a species of cambarid freshwater crayfish, native to northern Mexico, and southern and southeastern United States, but also introduced elsewhere, where it is often an invasive pest. P. clarkii is typically dark red, with long claws and head, small or no spines on the sides of its carapace just below the head, and rows of bright red bumps on the front and side of the first leg (Wikipedia contributors 2020).

The red swamp crayfish is most commonly found in warm fresh water, such as slowly flowing rivers, marshes, reservoirs, irrigation systems and rice paddies. It is considered to be the most ecologically plastic species in the order Decapoda, and is able to grow quickly even in only seasonally present water, being able to tolerate dry spells of up to four months. The red swamp crayfish grows quickly, and is capable of reaching weights in excess of 50 g, and sizes of 5.5–12 cm long. It is also able to tolerate slightly saline water, which is unusual for a crayfish. Additionally, P. clarkii are physiologically capable of tolerating relatively low dissolved oxygen concentrations. The average lifetime of Procambarus clarkii is five years (Wikipedia contributors 2020).

The burrowing activities of the red swamp crayfish can lead to damage to water courses and to crops, particularly rice, and its feeding can disrupt native ecosystems. It may out-compete the native crayfish species, and is a vector for the crayfish plague fungus Aphanomyces astaci, for crayfish virus vibriosis, and a number of worms parasitic on vertebrates. Their burrowing activities may also be a threat to civil infrastructure such as storm ponds and levees (Wikipedia contributors 2020).

Status and distribution in Luxembourg

There is no documented occurrence of Procambarus clarkii (Girard, 1852) in Luxembourg yet (MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF 2020).

Risk assessment

ISEIA protocol

A0 (3+3+3+3) = Alert List (Ries et al. 2017: 68).

Harmonia+ protocol

Not assessed yet.

Worldwide distribution

Bibliography

  • CABI, 2019. Procambarus clarkii. In: Invasive Species Compendium. Wallingford, UK: CAB International. URL: www.cabi.org/isc [accessed 2020-03-13]
  • MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2020. Procambarus clarkii in MNHNL-mdata, online portal combining species observation from Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist and GBIF. National Museum of Natural History, Luxembourg. URL: https://mdata.mnhn.lu [accessed 2020-03-13]
  • Ries, C., A. Arendt, C. Braunert, S. Christian, A. Dohet, A. Frantz, G. Geimer, M. Hellers, J. A. Massard, X. Mestdagh, R. Proess, N. Schneider & M. Pfeiffenschneider, 2017. Environmental impact assessment and black, watch and alert list classification after the ISEIA Protocol of invertebrates in Luxembourg. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 119: 63-70. [PDF 360 KB]
  • Wikipedia contributors, 2020. Procambarus clarkii, Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 3 February 2020, 18:43 UTC, <https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Procambarus_clarkii&oldid=939000553> [accessed 2020-03-13]

 Page content last updated on 2021-05-14.

Gammarus tigrinus Sexton, 1939

English n/a Status LU: established. 1st record: 1991.
Lëtzebuergesch n/a Status Eur.: established.
Français n/a RA: ISEIA: C2. Harmonia+: n/a.
Deutsch Gefleckter Flussflohkrebs Wikipedia: n/a (2020) | Wikispecies: n/a (2020)
Nederlands Tijgervlokreeft Back to the list of invertebrates

Brief description

Gammarus tigrinus Sexton, 1939 has eliminated some native species in parts of the river Rhine and the Baltic Sea; it is frequently a superior predator in comparison to indigenous species.

See the copyrighted picture at cabi.org

Status and distribution in Luxembourg

Gammarus tigrinus Sexton, 1939 was first documented on 22 May 1991 in the Moselle river across from Bech-Kleinmacher, municipality of Schengen (Massard & Geimer 1992). Dhur (1993) showed that Gammarus tigrinus was present in the Moselle all the way from Schengen to Wasserbillig.

There is no distribution map available because no data has been entered into the Recorder-Lux database so far (MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF 2019).

Risk assessment

ISEIA protocol

C2 (3+1+3+1) (Ries et al. 2017: 68).

Harmonia+ protocol

Not assessed yet.

Worldwide distribution

Bibliography

  • CABI, 2019. Gammarus tigrinus. In: Invasive Species Compendium. Wallingford, UK: CAB International. URL: www.cabi.org/isc [accessed 2020-03-13]
  • Dhur, G., 1993. Étude des espèces d’invertébrés immigrées ou introduites dans la Moselle luxembourgeoise et dans les écosystèmes aquatiques qui en dépendent. Historique et répartition actuelle. Centre univ. Luxemb., Dép. Form. pédag., mém. sci., 213 pp.
  • Dhur, G. & J.A. Massard, 1995. Etude historique et faunistique des Invertébrés immigrés ou introduits dans la Moselle luxembourgeoise et ses affluents. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 96: 127-156. [PDF 1896 KB]
  • Massard, J.A. & G. Geimer, 1992. Découverte de Gammarus tigrinus Sexton, 1939 dans la Moselle frontalière entre le Luxembourg et l’Allemagne (Crustacea: Amphipoda). Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 93: 195-198. [PDF 173 KB]
  • Meisch, C. & J.A. Massard, 2015. Les recherches sur les crustacés (Crustacea) du Luxembourg : aperçu historique. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 116: 381-390. [PDF 1,22 MB]
  • MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2019. MNHNL-mdata, online portal combining species observation from Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist and GBIF. National Museum of Natural History, Luxembourg. URL: https://mdata.mnhn.lu [Accessed 2019-10-24]
  • Ries, C., A. Arendt, C. Braunert, S. Christian, A. Dohet, A. Frantz, G. Geimer, M. Hellers, J. A. Massard, X. Mestdagh, R. Proess, N. Schneider & M. Pfeiffenschneider, 2017. Environmental impact assessment and black, watch and alert list classification after the ISEIA Protocol of invertebrates in Luxembourg. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 119: 63-70. [PDF 360 KB]

 Page content last updated on 2021-05-14. Last proofread by Caroline Grounds on 2019-12-10.

Dikerogammarus villosus (Sowinsky, 1894)

English Killer shrimp Status LU: present. 1st record: 2006.
Lëtzebuergesch Killercrevette Status Eur.: established.
Français Crevette tueuse RA: ISEIA: A1, Black List. Harmonia+: n/a.
Deutsch Großer Höckerflohkrebs Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English - Killer shrimp Wikipedia - Français - Crevette tueuse Wikipedia - Deutsch - Großer Höckerflohkrebs Nederlands | Wikispecies: n/a (2020)
Nederlands Pontokaspische Vlokreeft Back to the list of invertebrates

Brief description

Dikerogammarus villosus (8740859563)Dikerogammarus villosus (Sowinsky, 1894) is a freshwater amphipod originating from the Ponto-Caspian region. Its range expansion began in the late twentieth century and was associated with re-opening of the shipping canal between the Danube River and Main River (Vaate et al., 2002). Large body size, extremely voracious predatory behaviour, high fecundity and wide environmental tolerance make this amphipod a very successful invader of European waters. Invasion of D. villosus often results in significant local reduction or even extinction of native amphipods and other macroinvertebrates on which it preys (CABI 2019).

D. villosus is included on the list of the 100 most invasive exotic species of Europe (Devin & Beisel 2009).

Status and distribution in Luxembourg

Dikerogammarus villosus (Sowinsky, 1894) was first recorded in 2006: several specimen collected on 2006-05-12 in the river Moselle near Stadtbredimus were discovered in the Museums collections in July 2021 (Weigand in litt.). Another observation was made on 2018-06-20 in the river Sure near Wasserbillig / Langsur (MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF 2021). Accordingly, the Killer shrimp has been moved from the Alert List (Ries et al. 2017: 68) to the Black List.

Risk assessment

ISEIA protocol

Following the discovery of the Killer shrimp in July 2021 in the Museums collections (Weigand in litt.), the species was reassessed on 2021-07-29 to A1 (3+2+3+3) = Black List by C. Ries. Initial assessment: A0 (3+2+3+3) = Alert List (Ries et al. 2017: 68).

Harmonia+ protocol

Not assessed yet.

Worldwide distribution

Bibliography

  • CABI, 2019. Dikerogammarus villosus. In: Invasive Species Compendium. Wallingford, UK: CAB International. URL: www.cabi.org/isc [accessed 2020-03-13]
  • Devin, S. & J.-N. Beisel, 2009. Dikerogammarus villosus (Sowinsky), killer shrimp (Gammaridae, Crustacea). In: Handbook of alien species in Europe. Springer, 309.
  • MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2021. Dikerogammarus villosus in MNHNL-mdata, online portal combining species observation from Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist and GBIF. National Museum of Natural History, Luxembourg. URL: https://mdata.mnhn.lu [accessed 2020-03-13]
  • Ries, C., A. Arendt, C. Braunert, S. Christian, A. Dohet, A. Frantz, G. Geimer, M. Hellers, J. A. Massard, X. Mestdagh, R. Proess, N. Schneider & M. Pfeiffenschneider, 2017. Environmental impact assessment and black, watch and alert list classification after the ISEIA Protocol of invertebrates in Luxembourg. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 119: 63-70. [PDF 360 KB]

 Page content last updated on 2021-07-29. Last proofread by Caroline Grounds on 2019-12-10.

Potamopyrgus antipodarum (Gray, 1843)

English New Zealand mud snail Status LU: established. 1st record: 1996.
Lëtzebuergesch Neiséilännesch Zwergdeckelschleek Status Eur.: established.
Français Hydrobie des antipodes RA: ISEIA: A3, Black List. Harmonia+: n/a.
Deutsch Neuseeländische Zwergdeckelschnecke Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English - New Zealand mud snail Wikipedia - Français - Wikipedia - Deutsch - Neuseeländische Zwergdeckelschnecke Nederlands | Wikispecies: n/a (2020) | CABI
Nederlands Jenkins’ waterhoren Back to the list of invertebrates

Brief description

New Zealand Mud snailsPotamopyrgus antipodarum (Gray, 1843) is an aquatic snail native to New Zealand. It has been introduced to Europe, North America, Australia, Iraq, Turkey and Japan. In several ecosystems it is considered invasive because it becomes highly abundant, impacting the structure and function of the invaded ecosystems. Females are parthenogenetic, meaning they can reproduce without males, so a population can be founded by a single female. Most the non-native populations are female. There can be up to six generations per year, with an average number of 230 offspring per adult per year. P. antipodarum can also tolerate desiccation for several days, which allows for rapid spread (such as by birds and fishing tools) throughout different aquatic ecosystems. In several countries, including Spain, USA and Australia, it is considered as an invasive species (CABI 2019).

Status and distribution in Luxembourg

Records of Potamopyrgus antipodarum (Gray, 1843) in Luxembourg. Data source: Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2022-05-24.

Potamopyrgus antipodarum (Gray, 1843) was first documented by Gerhard Weitmann and Klaus Groh on 17 June 1996 in the Moselle river in the municipality of Remich (MNHNL 2000-).

Currently, 52 records of the New Zealand mud snail are accessible through the MNHNL-mdata portal (MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF 2019).

Risk assessment

ISEIA protocol

A3 (3+2+3+3) = Black List (Ries et al. 2017: 68).

Harmonia+ protocol

Not assessed yet.

Worldwide distribution

Bibliography

  • CABI, 2019. Potamopyrgus antipodarum (Gray, 1843). In: Invasive Species Compendium. Wallingford, UK: CAB International. URL: www.cabi.org/isc [accessed 2020-04-21]
  • MNHNL, 2000-. Potamopyrgus antipodarum (Gray, 1843) in Recorder-Lux, database on the natural heritage of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. Musée national d’histoire naturelle, Luxembourg. URL: https://mdata.mnhn.lu [Accessed 2019-10-24]
  • MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2019. Potamopyrgus antipodarum (Gray, 1843) in MNHNL-mdata, online portal combining species observation from Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist and GBIF. National Museum of Natural History, Luxembourg. URL: https://mdata.mnhn.lu [Accessed 2019-10-24]
  • Ries, C., A. Arendt, C. Braunert, S. Christian, A. Dohet, A. Frantz, G. Geimer, M. Hellers, J. A. Massard, X. Mestdagh, R. Proess, N. Schneider & M. Pfeiffenschneider, 2017. Environmental impact assessment and black, watch and alert list classification after the ISEIA Protocol of invertebrates in Luxembourg. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 119: 63-70. [PDF 360 KB]

 Page content last updated on 2020-04-21.

Sinanodonta woodiana (Lea, 1834)

English Chinese pond mussel Status LU: absent.
Lëtzebuergesch Chinesesch Weiermuschel Status Eur.: established.
Français Anodonte chinois RA: ISEIA: C0. Harmonia+: n/a.
Deutsch Chinesische Teichmuschel Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English - Chinese pond mussel Wikipedia - Français - Anodonte chinois Nederlands | Wikispecies: n/a (2020) | CABI
Nederlands n/a Back to the list of invertebrates

Brief description

1k Sinanodonta-woodiana 01Sinanodonta woodiana (Lea, 1834) is a species of freshwater mussel, an aquatic bivalve mollusk in the family Unionidae, the river mussels. The Chinese pond mussel can reach sizes of up to 30 cm and an age of 12–14 years. Yet, they can reproduce in their first year while only 3–4 cm in size. This large freshwater mussel is a habitat generalist with high silt tolerance. It is established worldwide despite having, like all unionid mussels, an obligatory parasitic stage (glochidium), which must encyst on host fish. The species is a broad host generalist, which can complete its development on all fish species tested, both coinvasive and native. The presence of S. woodiana can seriously influence indigenous unionid populations. Sinanodonta woodiana’s great success is attributed to importation and commercialization of Asian carp, its native host. S. woodiana was introduced in Tuscany both inadvertently, and for artificial pearl production. The species is also sold in garden centers as biofiltration for artificial ponds (CABI 2019).

Status and distribution in Luxembourg

Sinanodonta woodiana (Lea, 1834) has not yet been observed in Luxembourg (MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF 2020).

Risk assessment

ISEIA protocol

C0 (2+1+2+1) (Ries et al. 2017: 68).

Harmonia+ protocol

Not assessed yet.

Worldwide distribution

Bibliography

  • CABI, 2019. Sinanodonta woodiana (Lea, 1834). In: Invasive Species Compendium. Wallingford, UK: CAB International. URL: www.cabi.org/isc [accessed 2020-04-21]
  • MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2020. Sinanodonta woodiana (Lea, 1834) in MNHNL-mdata, online portal combining species observation from Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist and GBIF. National Museum of Natural History, Luxembourg. URL: https://mdata.mnhn.lu [Accessed 2020-04-21]
  • Ries, C., A. Arendt, C. Braunert, S. Christian, A. Dohet, A. Frantz, G. Geimer, M. Hellers, J. A. Massard, X. Mestdagh, R. Proess, N. Schneider & M. Pfeiffenschneider, 2017. Environmental impact assessment and black, watch and alert list classification after the ISEIA Protocol of invertebrates in Luxembourg. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 119: 63-70. [PDF 360 KB]

 Page content last updated on 2020-04-21.

Corbicula fluminalis (O.F. Müller, 1774)

English n/a Status LU: established. 1st record: 1996.
Lëtzebuergesch Asiatesch Kuerfmuschel Status Eur.: established.
Français Corbicule asiatique RA: ISEIA: A2, Black List. Harmonia+: n/a.
Deutsch Feingerippte Körbchenmuschel Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English - Corbicula fluminalis Wikipedia - Français - Corbicula fluminalis Wikipedia - Deutsch - Nederlands | Wikispecies: n/a (2020) | CABI
Nederlands Toegeknepen korfmossel Back to the list of invertebrates

Brief description

Feingerippte, innen und außenCorbicula fluminalis (O.F. Müller, 1774) is a species of freshwater clam, an aquatic bivalve mollusk in the family Cyrenidae. This species is distinct from, but often confused with, the rather similar species Corbicula fluminea. Even though both species are native to Asia, they are both present as introduced species in the United States and Europe, and they are both commonly known as “Asian clams” (Wikipedia contributors 2019).

The original distribution area of Corbicula fluminalis includes the Near East (the type material came from the Euphrates), Central Asia (Uzbekistan) and the Caucasus (Azerbaijan) and North Africa. The animals prefer to live on sandy and muddy river bottoms. Corbicula fluminalis is found today in almost all major Central European rivers, often sympatric with Corbicula fluminea (Wikipedia Editor 2019).

Status and distribution in Luxembourg

Records of Corbicula fluminalis (O.F. Müller, 1774) in Luxembourg. Data source: Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2022-05-24.

In Luxembourg, Corbicula fluminalis (O.F. Müller, 1774) was first found by Klaus Groh on 17 June 1996 in the Moselle river in the municipality of Remich (MNHNL 2000-, Bachmann & Usseglio-Polatera 1999).

Currently, 8 records (1996-2002) of Corbicula fluminalis are accessible through the MNHNL-mdata portal, all of them from the Moselle river (MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF 2019).

Risk assessment

ISEIA protocol

A2 (3+3+3+3) = Black List (Ries et al. 2017: 68).

Harmonia+ protocol

Not assessed yet.

Worldwide distribution

Bibliography

  • Bachmann V. & P. Usseglio-Polatera, 1999. Contribution of the macrobenthic compartment to the oxygen budget of a large regulated river: the Mosel. Hydrobiologia. 410 (17), 39-46.
  • CABI, 2019. Corbicula fluminalis (O.F. Müller, 1774). In: Invasive Species Compendium. Wallingford, UK: CAB International. URL: www.cabi.org/isc [accessed 2020-04-21]
  • MNHNL, 2000-. Corbicula fluminalis (O.F. Müller, 1774) in Recorder-Lux, database on the natural heritage of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. Musée national d’histoire naturelle, Luxembourg. URL: https://mdata.mnhn.lu [Accessed 2019-10-24]
  • MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2019. Corbicula fluminalis (O.F. Müller, 1774) in MNHNL-mdata, online portal combining species observation from Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist and GBIF. National Museum of Natural History, Luxembourg. URL: https://mdata.mnhn.lu [Accessed 2019-10-24]
  • Ries, C., A. Arendt, C. Braunert, S. Christian, A. Dohet, A. Frantz, G. Geimer, M. Hellers, J. A. Massard, X. Mestdagh, R. Proess, N. Schneider & M. Pfeiffenschneider, 2017. Environmental impact assessment and black, watch and alert list classification after the ISEIA Protocol of invertebrates in Luxembourg. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 119: 63-70. [PDF 360 KB]
  • Wikipedia Bearbeiter, 2019. Feingerippte Körbchenmuschel. In: Wikipedia, Die freie Enzyklopädie. Bearbeitungsstand: 20. Dezember 2019, 15:19 UTC. URL: https://de.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Feingerippte_K%C3%B6rbchenmuschel&oldid=195082277 [accessed 2020-04-21]
  • Wikipedia contributors, 2019. Corbicula fluminalis, Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 10 April 2019, 21:39 UTC, <https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Corbicula_fluminalis&oldid=891900774> [accessed 2020-04-21]

 Page content last updated on 2020-04-28.

Corbicula fluminea (O.F. Müller, 1774)

English Asian clam Status LU: established. 1st record: 1996.
Lëtzebuergesch Kleng asiatesch Kuerfmuschel Status Eur.: established.
Français Palourde asiatique RA: ISEIA: A2, Black List. Harmonia+: n/a.
Deutsch Asiatische Körbchenmuschel Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English - Asian clam Wikipedia - Français - Palourde asiatique Wikipedia - Deutsch - Asiatische Körbchenmuschel Nederlands | Wikispecies: n/a (2020) | CABI
Nederlands Aziatische korfmossel Back to the list of invertebrates

Brief description

Corbicula flumineaCorbicula fluminea (O.F. Müller, 1774) is an inland water, filter-feeding bivalve native to southeast Asia but causing numerous problems in its new range of distribution in the Americas, Europe and Australia. C. fluminea spreads when it is attached to boats or carried in ballast water, used as bait, sold through the aquarium trade and carried with water currents. Its reproductive success and ability to spread rapidly has resulted in this species having one of the most rapid expansions of any non-native species in North America. Before the invasion of the zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha, in North America, C. fluminea was described by McMahon (1983) as ‘one of the most important molluscan pest species ever introduced into the United States’. Aldridge and Muller (2001) review the potential impacts that the spread of C. fluminea may have on British industry and aquatic systems. In the DAISIE project, C. fluminea is listed on the 100 worst invasive species (CABI 2019).

Status and distribution in Luxembourg

Records of Corbicula fluminea (O.F. Müller, 1774) in Luxembourg. Data source: Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2022-05-24.

In Luxembourg, Corbicula fluminea (O.F. Müller, 1774) was first documented by Klaus Groh on 17 June 1996 in the Moselle river in the municipality of Remich (MNHNL 2000-). It was expected by 1995 that the species would soon appear in the Moselle (Dhur & Massard 1995: 150).

Currently, 16 records are accessible through the MNHNL-mdata portal (MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF 2019).

Risk assessment

ISEIA protocol

A2 (3+3+3+3) = Black List (Ries et al. 2017: 68).

Harmonia+ protocol

Not assessed yet.

Worldwide distribution

Bibliography

  • CABI, 2019. Corbicula fluminea (O.F. Müller, 1774). In: Invasive Species Compendium. Wallingford, UK: CAB International. URL: www.cabi.org/isc [accessed 2020-04-21]
  • Dhur, G. & J.A. Massard, 1995. Étude historique et faunistique des Invertébrés immigrés ou introduits dans la Moselle luxembourgeoise et ses affluents. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 96: 127-156. [PDF 1896 KB]
  • MNHNL, 2000-. Corbicula fluminea (O.F. Müller, 1774) in Recorder-Lux, database on the natural heritage of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. Musée national d’histoire naturelle, Luxembourg. URL: https://mdata.mnhn.lu [Accessed 2019-10-24]
  • MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2019. Corbicula fluminea (O.F. Müller, 1774) in MNHNL-mdata, online portal combining species observation from Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist and GBIF. National Museum of Natural History, Luxembourg. URL: https://mdata.mnhn.lu [Accessed 2019-10-24]
  • Ries, C., A. Arendt, C. Braunert, S. Christian, A. Dohet, A. Frantz, G. Geimer, M. Hellers, J. A. Massard, X. Mestdagh, R. Proess, N. Schneider & M. Pfeiffenschneider, 2017. Environmental impact assessment and black, watch and alert list classification after the ISEIA Protocol of invertebrates in Luxembourg. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 119: 63-70. [PDF 360 KB]

 Page content last updated on 2020-04-28.

Dreissena polymorpha (Pallas, 1771)

English Zebra mussel  Status LU: established. 1st record: <1892.
Lëtzebuergesch Zebramuschel Status Eur.: established.
Français Moule zébrée RA: ISEIA: A2, Black List. Harmonia+: n/a.
Deutsch Zebramuschel Wikipedia: Wikipedia - English - Zebra mussel Wikipedia - Français - Moule zébrée Wikipedia - Deutsch - Zebramuschel Nederlands | Wikispecies: n/a | CABI
Nederlands Driehoeksmossel Back to the list of invertebrates

Brief description

Dreissena polymorpha (I1957) 0265 (39449820624)To date, D. polymorpha has been the most aggressive freshwater invader worldwide. Dreissenids are the only freshwater bivalves that attach to hard substrates in high densities and have a planktonic larval stage. This life history facilitates their abilities as invaders, and allows them to become enormously abundant when introduced into a new water body. Once introduced their populations can grow rapidly, and the total biomass of a population can exceed 10 times that of all other native benthic invertebrates. D. polymorpha is native to the drainage basins of the Black, Caspian and Aral Seas. During the nineteenth century its range has expanded westward to most of western Europe, the UK, and North America, where it is found in the Great Lakes and all major river drainages east of the Rocky Mountains and causes multiple economic impacts on fisheries, aquaculture, water attractions and aquatic transport (CABI 2019).

Status and distribution in Luxembourg

Records of Dreissena polymorpha (Pallas, 1771) in Luxembourg. Data source: Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2022-05-24.

In Luxembourg, Dreissena polymorpha (Pallas, 1771) was first mentioned by Victor Ferrant in 1892 as occurring in the Moselle river (Ferrant 1892; Dhur & Massard 1995; MNHNL 2000-).

Currently, 18 records of the zebra mussel are accessible through the MNHNL-mdata portal (MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF 2019).

Risk assessment

ISEIA protocol

A2 (3+3+3+3) = Black List (Ries et al. 2017: 68).

Harmonia+ protocol

Not assessed yet.

Worldwide distribution

Bibliography

  • CABI, 2019. Dreissena polymorpha (Pallas, 1771). In: Invasive Species Compendium. Wallingford, UK: CAB International. URL: www.cabi.org/isc [accessed 2020-04-21]
  • Dhur, G. & J.A. Massard, 1995. Étude historique et faunistique des Invertébrés immigrés ou introduits dans la Moselle luxembourgeoise et ses affluents. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 96: 127-156. [PDF 1896 KB]
  • Ferrant, V., 1892. Beiträge zur Molluskenfauna des Grossherzogtums Luxemburg (Schluss). Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 2: 21-26. [PDF 419 KB]
  • MNHNL, 2000-. Dreissena polymorpha (Pallas, 1771) in Recorder-Lux, database on the natural heritage of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. Musée national d’histoire naturelle, Luxembourg. URL: https://mdata.mnhn.lu [Accessed 2019-10-24]
  • MNHNL, iNaturalist & GBIF, 2019. Dreissena polymorpha (Pallas, 1771) in MNHNL-mdata, online portal combining species observation from Recorder-Lux, iNaturalist and GBIF. National Museum of Natural History, Luxembourg. URL: https://mdata.mnhn.lu [Accessed 2019-10-24]
  • Ries, C., A. Arendt, C. Braunert, S. Christian, A. Dohet, A. Frantz, G. Geimer, M. Hellers, J. A. Massard, X. Mestdagh, R. Proess, N. Schneider & M. Pfeiffenschneider, 2017. Environmental impact assessment and black, watch and alert list classification after the ISEIA Protocol of invertebrates in Luxembourg. Bull. Soc. Nat. luxemb. 119: 63-70. [PDF 360 KB]

 Page content last updated on 2020-04-21.